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According to himself, Donald Trump loves women. What he reportedly does not love, however, is when women play men — especially men he has put into positions of power.

Although Alec Baldwin (and his impeccable Trump impression) was hosting, the most recent cold open on "Saturday Night Live" featured the return of Melissa McCarthy as White House press secretary Sean Spicer — chewing an allotted one piece of gum, using Barbies to explain the Muslim ban, and terrorizing members of the press with a motorized podium. It seemed designed to be everything Trump hates.


Since reports of Trump's distain for McCarthy's Spicer impression broke last week, rumors and casting suggestions have circulated as to which other members of Trump's administration could be played by women on "SNL." Kate McKinnon as newly appointed United States Attorney General Jeff Sessions was an unexpected but totally welcome addition to the roster — and one that undoubtedly got under the president's skin.

Even the part of the briefing that became a QVC-type ad for Ivanka Trump's jewelry and accessories seemed designed to make the president uncomfortable. Not because Ivanka's products were being advertised (Trump's made it clear how he feels about that), but because of who was wearing them.

With McKinnon in costume as Sessions and unable to step into Kellyanne Conway's shoes to recreate her recent breach of ethics, McCarthy's Spicer filled that role, speaking highly of the brand in front of the press, even wearing "Ivanka's" bracelet and heels. If Trump's recent comments on the need for his female employees to "dress like women" are to be believed, the sight of his press secretary being played by a woman wearing heels and a sparkly bracelet must be infuriating to him.

When the most powerful person in the country is a man with a deep need to control his appearance and the appearance of those around him, sometimes the only way to remind him that the citizens don't work for the president — and that the president works for the citizens — is to constantly refuse to comply with his demands. It would be even more hilarious if it weren't so necessary.

Live, from 2017: Women can wear whatever the hell they want.

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U.S. Soccer star expertly handles an Iranian reporter’s loaded questions about race.

Tyler Adams’s response proves exactly why he’s the captain of the US soccer team.

Tyler Adams expertly handles Iranian reporter's question

Reporters are supposed to ask the right questions to get to the truth but sometimes it seems sports reporters ask questions to throw you off your game. There's no doubt that this Iranian reporter who was questioning Tyler Adams, the US soccer team captain at the press conference during the World Cup had an agenda that didn't involve getting to the truth.

It's not clear if the questions were designed to throw the young player off of his game or if the goal was embarrassment. It really is hard to tell, but Adams handled the unexpectedly harsh encounter with intelligence and poise when some may have found it justified for him to get angry.

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This article originally appeared on 12.01.21


Beatle George Harrison was pigeon-holed as the "Quiet Beatle," but the youngest member of the Fab Four had an acerbic, dry sense of humor that was as sharp as the rest of his bandmates.

He gave great performances in the musical comedy classics, "A Hard Days Night" and "Help!" while holding his own during The Beatles' notoriously anarchic press conferences. After he left the band in 1970, in addition to his musical career, he would produce the 1979 Monty Python classic, "The Life of Brian."

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"Time is the one thing we cannot increase.”

Over his seven years as host of “The Daily Show,” Trevor Noah brought us laughter and valuable insights, even with a pandemic and political upheaval. He made such a positive mark that the announcement of his departure from the show came as bittersweet news to fans.

During an interview with Hoda Kotb of “Today,” Trevor Noah gave further explanation to his personal decision to leave, and in typical Noah fashion, it touched on something universal in the process.

“I realized during the pandemic,” he told Kotb, “everyone talks about a ‘work-life balance.’ But that almost creates the idea that your work and your life are two separate things. When in fact, I came to realize during the pandemic that it’s just a ‘life-life balance.’ It’s just your life.”

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10 ways kids appear to be acting naughty but actually aren't.

Many of kids' so-called 'bad' behaviors are actually normal developmental acts of growing up.

This article originally appeared on 07.19.17


When we recognize kids' unwelcome behaviors as reactions to environmental conditions, developmental phases, or our own actions, we can respond proactively, and with compassion.

Here are 10 ways kids may seem like they're acting "naughty" but really aren't. And what parents can do to help.

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