LOL: Melissa McCarthy brought 'Spicey' back to 'SNL' with Kate McKinnon as Jeff Sessions.

According to himself, Donald Trump loves women. What he reportedly does not love, however, is when women play men — especially men he has put into positions of power.

Although Alec Baldwin (and his impeccable Trump impression) was hosting, the most recent cold open on "Saturday Night Live" featured the return of Melissa McCarthy as White House press secretary Sean Spicer — chewing an allotted one piece of gum, using Barbies to explain the Muslim ban, and terrorizing members of the press with a motorized podium. It seemed designed to be everything Trump hates.


Since reports of Trump's distain for McCarthy's Spicer impression broke last week, rumors and casting suggestions have circulated as to which other members of Trump's administration could be played by women on "SNL." Kate McKinnon as newly appointed United States Attorney General Jeff Sessions was an unexpected but totally welcome addition to the roster — and one that undoubtedly got under the president's skin.

Even the part of the briefing that became a QVC-type ad for Ivanka Trump's jewelry and accessories seemed designed to make the president uncomfortable. Not because Ivanka's products were being advertised (Trump's made it clear how he feels about that), but because of who was wearing them.

With McKinnon in costume as Sessions and unable to step into Kellyanne Conway's shoes to recreate her recent breach of ethics, McCarthy's Spicer filled that role, speaking highly of the brand in front of the press, even wearing "Ivanka's" bracelet and heels. If Trump's recent comments on the need for his female employees to "dress like women" are to be believed, the sight of his press secretary being played by a woman wearing heels and a sparkly bracelet must be infuriating to him.

When the most powerful person in the country is a man with a deep need to control his appearance and the appearance of those around him, sometimes the only way to remind him that the citizens don't work for the president — and that the president works for the citizens — is to constantly refuse to comply with his demands. It would be even more hilarious if it weren't so necessary.

Live, from 2017: Women can wear whatever the hell they want.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.