Donald Trump thinks women should dress a certain way. Twitter proved him wrong.

Coming from the world of reality TV and beauty pageants, it's no surprise that President Donald Trump has a pretty serious interest in the optics of any given situation — with a focus on people who look the part and less about if they're actually able to do the job.

Whether talking about "his generals," his cabinet, or his vice president, Trump often puts an emphasis on on looking "straight from central casting" (yes, he really said that) as one of the things he seeks in candidates for just about any position.


Trump poses with Miss USA 2012, Olivia Culpo, in Las Vegas. Photo by David Becker/Getty Images.

But it was a line from a recent article at Axios that had people scratching their heads (emphasis mine):

"Trump likes the women who work for him 'to dress like women,' says a source who worked on Trump's campaign. 'Even if you're in jeans, you need to look neat and orderly.' We hear that women who worked in Trump's campaign field offices — folks who spend more time knocking on doors than attending glitzy events — felt pressure to wear dresses to impress Trump.'"

What does it mean to "dress like a woman"?

How aren't we past this by now? It's a statement that certainly gives off a very Victorian vibe.

May 1884: Late Victorian flower show and garden party dresses, with high bustles and fitted corset lines. Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images.

It's 2017! Are you a woman? Are you wearing clothes?

If you answered "yes" to both questions, congratulations! You're dressed like a woman!

In response, people took to Twitter to provide some powerful examples of what it means to #DressLikeAWoman whether you're at work ...

... or, of course, at play.

Comedians Cameron Espisito and Rhea Butcher shared this example of women dressed like women while getting married to another woman.

Other people shared photos of women who dress like women while serving their country.

The point here is that there's no right or wrong way to be a woman (or a man, for that matter) and that includes what you decide to wear.

Some women like to wear dresses; some don't. It's not what's being worn, but who's wearing it that counts. So wear a dress, or a suit, or scrubs, or a uniform, or even a wookie costume while you belly dance — just be yourself while you're doing it, and you'll be fine.

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

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