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[rebelmouse-image 19534195 dam="1" original_size="5850x3750" caption="Photo from Billie Body Brand/Unsplash." expand=1]Photo from Billie Body Brand/Unsplash.

There's something odd about razor commercials.

Razor companies seem to like to pretend that hairy women do not exist while simultaneously trying to sell them products. In most of these commercials, bikini-clad women are featured shaving their already hairless legs. But Billie, a razor brand, thinks it's time to finally break the status quo around body hair.


In June, Billie launched the "Project Body Hair" campaign to celebrate body hair positivity.

The message of the campaign is simple: Everyone has body hair — even women — and it's time for us to accept that.

According to their website, this campaign was largely motivated by the women's razor brand industry's failure to acknowledge female body hair in their advertisement in the last 100 years. In response, the startup made a video commercial featuring women from different body sizes and ethnic backgrounds showing off their hairy legs, underarms, stomachs, and unibrows. In addition, they also uploaded free stock photos of hairy women on Unsplash to counter the lack of images online of female body hair.

But you're probably wondering: If Billie is celebrating female body hair, then why are they selling razors?

The answer is quite simple. Billie believes whether or not a woman chooses to remove her body hair is up to her and shouldn't be up to what society finds acceptable.

This isn't the first time Billie has fought back against sexism in the razor brand industry.

Billie's sole purpose is to serve as an alternative option in a world where the so-called "pink tax" marginalizes female consumers. The pink tax refers to the trend of companies charging women more for products and services. It's a ridiculous trend that disadvantages women consumers.

To fight against the pink tax, Billie sells razors at an affordable price through a subscription service.

Billie is not alone in the body hair positivity movement.

Over time, more and more women are speaking out in celebration of their body hair. Julia Roberts was one of the first Hollywood actress to show off her underarm hair on the red carpet in her 1999 premiere of "Notting Hill." Nearly four years ago, Madonna posted an Instagram pic featuring the fuzzies under her arm. And last year, Bella Thorne posted a Snapchat photo of her unshaven legs.

Long hair...... Don't Care!!!!!! #artforfreedom #rebelheart #revolutionoflove

A post shared by Madonna (@madonna) on

It's not just celebrities either. Women diagnosed with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) deal with symptoms that include excessive body hair growth. In this Allure story, 15 women with PCOS explained their decision to show off their body hair instead of removing it. Harnaam Kaur, who also has PCOS, decided to grow out her beard after many unsuccessful years of attempting to remove it. She now is a model and and anti-bullying activist.

Hopefully, Billie's Project Body Hair campaign will not only inspire more women to feel confident in their own bodies, but encourage other razor companies to follow suit.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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Small actions lead to big movements.

Acts of kindness—we know they’re important not only for others, but for ourselves. They can contribute to a more positive community and help us feel more connected, happier even. But in our incessantly busy and hectic lives, performing good deeds can feel like an unattainable goal. Or perhaps we equate generosity with monetary contribution, which can feel like an impossible task depending on a person’s financial situation.

Perhaps surprisingly, the main reason people don’t offer more acts of kindness is the fear of being misunderstood. That is, at least, according to The Kindness Test—an online questionnaire about being nice to others that more than 60,000 people from 144 countries completed. It does make sense—having your good intentions be viewed as an awkward source of discomfort is not exactly fun for either party.

However, the results of The Kindness Test also indicated those fears were perhaps unfounded. The most common words people used were "happy," "grateful," "loved," "relieved" and "pleased" to describe their feelings after receiving kindness. Less than 1% of people said they felt embarrassed, according to the BBC.


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She's enjoying the big benefits of some simple life hacks.

James Clear’s landmark book “Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones” has sold more than 9 million copies worldwide. The book is incredibly popular because it has a simple message that can help everyone. We can develop habits that increase our productivity and success by making small changes to our daily routines.

"It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis,” James Clear writes. “It is only when looking back 2 or 5 or 10 years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.”

His work proves that we don’t need to move mountains to improve ourselves, just get 1% better every day.

Most of us are reluctant to change because breaking old habits and starting new ones can be hard. However, there are a lot of incredibly easy habits we can develop that can add up to monumental changes.

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