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These hilarious pins are a great reminder to guys to check themselves for testicular cancer
via The BC Cancer Foundation

Testicular cancer typically affects men between the ages of 16 and 44 and is the most common solid tumor to occur in men of this age group. These tumors grow rapidly and can double in size in just 10 to 30 days.

The disease is potentially fatal if not discovered early and accounts for about 11%-13% of all cancer deaths of men between the ages of 15-35. An estimated 9,60 people were diagnosed with testicular cancer in 2020, resulting in around 440 deaths.

So it's incredibly important for people with testicles to check themselves regularly.


That's why The BC Cancer Foundation in British Columbia, Canada has come up with a hilarious, memorable, and somewhat anatomically correct new testicular cancer awareness pin to remind people to check themselves. It's a clever way to spark up some conversation about a health issue that a lot of people are uncomfortable talking about.

The Ballsy Pin takes the cancer awareness ribbons we're used to seeing, turns them upside down, and adds a new friend for company. The ribbons hang a bit differently than the usual pin as well.

These pins are great because they use humor to get people's attention which, for some young men, a risque joke may be the best way to get them to listen.

"Our aim is to increase awareness among young men and promote early detection by encouraging them to do self-checks at home," said Sarah Roth, President & CEO, BC Cancer Foundation. "We hope the Ballsy Ribbon will become as recognizable and synonymous with testicular cancer as the pink ribbon for breast cancer."

The pins are being released in commemoration of Testicular Cancer Awareness Month which happens every April.

London Drugs is helping to spread the word by making the Ballsy Ribbon available with a donation to The BC Cancer Foundation at its locations across British Columbia.

Both groups are encouraging those who wear the pin to share photos of it online at #BallsyRibbon.

"The health and wellness of our customers is a core piece of our business," Chris Chiew, General Manager of Pharmacy at London Drugs, said in a statement. "We are proud to partner with BC Cancer Foundation to raise awareness for Testicular Cancer and how men can take charge of their health."

Now that we've got your attention: If you have testicles, it's recommended that you check yourself once a month. Some of the warning signs of testicular cancer are a lump or swelling in a testicle, loss of sex drive, and tender or swollen breasts.

Remember, early detection is the key to preventing the disease from becoming fatal.

HOW TO SELF-CHECK FOR TESTICULAR CANCER:

Step 1: Perform the test during or after a hot shower or bath

Step 2: Test one testicle at a time by gently rolling it between your thumb and fingers.

Step 3: If you notice any hard lumps, smooth rounded bumps, or changes in size and consistency, contact your doctor.



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