More

The Part Of The Ferguson Protests That No One Wants You To See

Hi. I was raised in St. Louis, Missouri. I was in town early for Thanksgiving, so I was also in town for the Ferguson grand jury announcement and the week following. While I was decorating a friend's small business for Christmas (yes, really), another friend was talking about the time the protests came to Trader Joe's, where he works.

The Part Of The Ferguson Protests That No One Wants You To See

Then he showed me these flyers.

He told me, "The protestors apparently leave them on EVERY CAR, EVERY TIME they protest."

Here are some more close-ups so you can read 'em if you want!

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon's number is 573-751-3222, in case you didn't catch that. Or you can email Steve Stenger at SStenger@stlouisco.com. Maybe they'd like to re-read these flyers a bit.


"You make an excellent point, flyer!"
— My inner monologue

This part stood out to me:
"An average police training in the United States is 15 weeks. Fifteen weeks is nothing. Police forces in other countries have [training] twice, three times as long ... It's all about how police officers are prepared to deal with people who pose threats ... we are saving money on police training ... It's irresponsible ... Basically, what we're doing is putting a dollar sign on people's lives, both of police and of members of the public."
— Martha Haberfiled, PHD in Criminal Justice

It's been really weird hearing the national news talk about protesters who don't know what they want when I'm sitting here in my kitchen in St. Louis looking at a flyer that spells it out so clearly. I don't get it.

Based on the amount of retweets these flyers got, I'm not the *only* one who doesn't get it...

Maybe if enough of you see their flyers, the news might start feeling left out and join the "noticing the flyers protesters bring to every protest" party!

Welp, the two skateboarding events added to the Olympics this year have wrapped up for the women's teams, and the results are historic in more ways than one.

Japan's Kokona Hiraki, age 12, just won the silver medal in women's park skateboarding, making her Japan's youngest Olympic medalist ever. Great Britain's Sky Brown, who was 12 when she qualified for the Tokyo Olympics and is now 13, won the bronze, making her Great Britain's youngest medalist ever. And those two medal wins mean that two-thirds of the six medalists in the two women's skateboarding events are age 13 or younger. (The gold and silver medalists in women's street skateboarding, Japan's Momiji Nishiya and Brazil's Rayssa Leal, are also 13.)

That's mind-blowing.

Keep Reading Show less