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congress

Democracy

Congressman wears his 4-month-old son during historic vote on the House floor

Bringing your baby to work can be a challenge, whether you work from home, in an office or in Congress.

Congressman wears 4-month-old son during vote.

In 2020, most parents got a crash course on bringing their kid to work, when work was suddenly at the kitchen table. Overnight, the roles of work and parenting collided, notwithstanding that for some parents this is the norm due to high child care costs or other life circumstances. Rep. Jimmy Gomez, D-Calif., is making sure that families don't get lost in the shuffle in the U.S. House.

The congressman's family came into Washington, D.C., from California to watch him get sworn in on January 3. But when things took a bit longer due to the prolonged speaker vote, Gomez felt it was important for his son to be on the floor with him when he cast his historic vote for Hakeem Jeffries. Jeffries will be the first Black minority leader in the House.

Bringing your baby to work can be a challenge, whether you work from home, in an office or in Congress. Babies may be little bundles of joy but if you miss their feeding time they become hungry bundles of anger. And Gomez's 4-month-old son, Hodge, was on a strict feeding schedule so he knew things could get a bit more complicated. It didn't discourage his decision.

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Pop Culture

Watch Mister Rogers totally win over a tough, skeptical senator in 6 minutes

"I'm supposed to be a pretty tough guy, and this is the first time I've had goosebumps in the past two days."

Fred Rogers managed to secure $20 million in PBS funding from Congress.

On May 1, 1969, Fred Rogers sat before the Senate Subcommittee on Communications to make the case for funding children's educational programming. His show, Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, had recently become nationally syndicated, and the program relied on the $20 million in government funding allotted to public broadcasting. That funding was on the chopping block, with President Nixon wanting to cut it in half, so Rogers went to Washington, D.C., to advocate for the funding before Congress.

In a video clip of Rogers' testimony, we can see how subcommittee chairman Senator John O. Pastore sat across from Rogers, appearing somewhat disinterested. He had never heard of or seen Mister Rogers' Neighborhood and wasn't familiar with Rogers himself.

"Alright Rogers, you have the floor," he said in an almost condescending tone.

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Democracy

One minute of fed-up celebrities talking about guns is actually worth your time.

There are so many celebrities in this video that I honestly lost count. But I'm SO GLAD they came together to make it, because people tend to listen to celebrities — for better and worse. And this is definitely a case of the better.

Image from YouTube video.

Will Ferrell and Beyonce Knowles-Carter.

This article originally appeared on 06.23.15


There were nearly 100 school shootings in the two years after Newtown.

Despite that, Congress still hasn't found the will to deal with gun violence in the U.S. Suffice it to say a lot of people are angry. Including the pile of celebrities you'll see below.

The plan is simple...

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President Biden's first address to Congress on Wednesday night covered a number of topics: COVID-19, the war in Afghanistan, climate change, healthcare, taxes and more. But it was a personal comment to America's transgender community that might have been the most powerful moment of the night.

Transgender Americans continue to be one of the most openly discriminated against communities in America. Since Biden's election, a number of states have proposed bills that would restrict the rights of transgender citizens, including children.

Some leaders have bravely stood up for the rights of our most vulnerable citizens. For example, North Dakota's Republican Gov. Doug Burgum recently vetoed a bill that would have banned trans girls from competing in sports.

"To all the transgender Americans watching at home, especially the young people who are so brave, I want you to know that your president has your back," Biden told Congress in his call for passage of the Equality Act.


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