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She wanted to rock her short skirt with no fear, so she joined them

All around the world, V-Girls are changing how people think about V-Day, or Valentine's Day.

She wanted to rock her short skirt with no fear, so she joined them

V-Girls are a global network of 6,000 fearless young women from 26 different countries. They're empowering themselves and their friends to make change in the world.

One way they're doing that is by celebrating love of self and sisterhood.

What does that actually mean in real life?

Members host workshops on self-confidence so others can walk down the street without catcalls seeping into their consciousness. They write monologues that proclaim "I'm an Emotional Creature" and don't apologize for it. They teach other girls to speak up for themselves without feeling shame.


V-Girls all over the world are being proactive in their communities. They're tackling big issues and fighting them head-on.

Here's what's on their minds:

"I want a world not only of tolerance, but peace, and security, and love. I want to be able to walk down the street and rock my short skirt and love my fat thighs. I want more women to be empowered and know that through passion they can achieve so much."

"I believe that if every girl in the world today stood up against pleasing, whether it's pleasing friends and doing stuff you're not ready to do, or pleasing a boyfriend by not using a condom, if we just stop pleasing and began refusing and being our authentic selves and keeping our identity true to who we are, then I believe we can realize the change we want."

"Nobody is allowed to abuse my body, nobody is allowed to take control of my body, nobody is allowed to take control of my mind, my spirit, and my soul. I'm a refuser. I will refuse to let anybody abuse who I am."

"We have to allow ourselves to be who we really are, and let that come out. You have to believe you're worth it. You have to believe you deserve it and that you can do anything. And the minute girls allow themselves to be who they really are and believe in themselves and love themselves, the world will change."

V-Girls is connected to a larger effort called V-Day. Most folks associate V-Day with Valentine's Day, which is cool, but it's also the name of a group, millions strong, that is committed to ending violence against women. The "V" in V-Day stands for vagina, victory, and Valentine.

"Girls are the future of our movement. Women are the primary resource of our planet. It is imperative to educate and nurture future activists so we can see our vision of a world free from violence against women and girls come true." —V-Day

Now that says more to me than any store-bought Valentine ever could.

Check out the video below to hear from these brave girls.

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Davina Agudelo was born in Miami, Florida, but she grew up in Medellín, Colombia.

"I am so grateful for my upbringing in Colombia, surrounded by mountains and mango trees, and for my Colombian family," Agudelo says. "Colombia is the place where I learned what's truly essential in life." It's also where she found her passion for the arts.

While she was growing up, Colombia was going through a violent drug war, and Agudelo turned to literature, theater, singing, and creative writing as a refuge. "Journaling became a sacred practice, where I could leave on the page my dreams & longings as well as my joy and sadness," she says. "During those years, poetry came to me naturally. My grandfather was a poet and though I never met him, maybe there is a little bit of his love for poetry within me."

In 1998, when she left her home and everyone she loved and moved to California, the arts continued to be her solace and comfort. She got her bachelor's degree in theater arts before getting certified in journalism at UCLA. It was there she realized the need to create a media platform that highlighted the positive contributions of LatinX in the US.

"I know the power that storytelling and writing our own stories have and how creative writing can aid us in our own transformation."

In 2012, she started Alegría Magazine and it was a great success. Later, she refurbished a van into a mobile bookstore to celebrate Latin American and LatinX indie authors and poets, while also encouraging children's reading and writing in low-income communities across Southern California.

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via Number 10 / Flickr

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) approved a measure last month that could pave the way for the Catholic Church to deny President Joe Biden communion. The conservative bishops hope to prevent Biden from participating in the sacred ritual because of his support for abortion rights.

Biden is a devout Catholic who considered becoming a priest in his youth. He rarely misses mass, holds a rosary while making critical decisions, and often quotes scriptures. When asked about the bishops' decision Biden said it is "a private matter and I don't think that's going to happen."

The bishops hope the new guidance would push "Catholics who are cultural, political, or parochial leaders to witness the faith."

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