She’s an Apple engineer AND Victoria’s Secret model. These sexist trolls never stood a chance.

Lyndsey Scott has a resume that almost sounds too impressive to be true: she’s works as a tutor on Apple’s iOS team and is a software engineer. Full stop. That’s a career worthy of serious accolades.

But she’s also a celebrated Victoria’s Secret model.

And it’s her vocation as a model that led some deeply misguided sexist trolls to question the 31-year-old’s qualifications.

Big mistake.

Scott didn’t just “own” these would-be bullies, she did it with the facts. They say sunlight is the best disinfectant and her truth rays sent the cockroaches of the internet scurrying for cover.

Here’s how it all started: An Instagram post headlined ‘This Victoria’s Secret model can program code in Python, C++, Java, MIPS, and Objective-C.’ came under attack on a Reddit forum.

A few anonymous users questioned whether Scott was the real deal, mansplaining their way past any research or actual knowledge by assuming she wasn’t a “real” coder and was simply using the term to give herself an elevated sense of importance.

One user openly speculated that she had simply run a simple program that “programmed” the words “Hello, world.”

Another even more condescending user tried to explain the complexities of coding, something he assumed Scott clearly didn’t have a functioning grasp of:

“Anyone can write code, not many people can write code well though. Languages are easy to learn, but scalable, readable, maintainable, efficient code is not.”

Of course, the problem with all of this is that Scott is in fact an extremely qualified coder.

And while she noted that she normally chooses to not engage with hateful strangers online, in this case she felt it was important to clear the air. So, Scott jumped into the comments section of the Coding Engineer Instagram account and took on the role of anti-troll, writing:

I have 27481 points on StackOverflow; I’m on the iOS tutorial team for RayWendelich.com; I’m the Lead iOS software engineer for @RallyBound, the 841st fastest growing company in the US according to @incmagazine, I have a Bachelor’s degree from Amherst where I double majored in computer science and theater, and I’m able to live my life doing everything I love. Looking at these comments I wonder why 41% of women in technical careers drop out because of a hostile work environment 🤔 #gofigure

In a follow-up post on her own Instagram account, Scott wrote:

“I normally try to ignore negatively, but decided to jump into the comment section of this one. Not trying to brag lol, just stating facts in the hope I’ll convince at least one negative commenter that programmers can come in all shapes, sizes, genders, races, etc. so they’ll think twice before doubting other women and girls they encounter in tech.”

Scott shared her message across Twitter as well, where it was welcomed with open arms by other women in tech:

Shutting down sexist trolls is a worthy task in and of itself.

But like Scott said, reminding women that they have every right to succeed in their chosen field is an act worth celebrating.

Courtesy of Tiffany Obi
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With the COVID-19 pandemic upending her community, Brooklyn-based singer Tiffany Obi turned to healing those who had lost loved ones the way she knew best — through music.

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As she looked at the empty piano at a recent performance, Obi's had a revelation.

"Music just makes everything better," Obi said. "If there was an app to bring musicians together on short notice, we could bring so much joy to the people at those memorials."

Using the coding skills she gained at Pursuit — a rigorous, four-year intensive program that trains adults from underserved backgrounds and no prior experience in programming — Obi turned this market gap into the very first app she created.

She worked alongside four other Pursuit Fellows to build In Tune, an app that connects musicians in close proximity to foster opportunities for collaboration.

When she learned about and applied to Pursuit, Obi was eager to be a part of Pursuit's vision to empower their Fellows to build successful careers in tech. Pursuit's Fellows are representative of the community they want to build: 50% women, 70% Black or Latinx, 40% immigrant, 60% non-Bachelor's degree holders, and more than 50% are public assistance recipients.

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Package Free Shop has created products to help fight climate change one cotton swab at a time! Founded by Lauren Singer, otherwise known as, "the girl with the jar" (she initially went viral for fitting 8 years of all of the waste she's created in one mason jar). Package Free is an ecosystem of brands on a mission to make the world less trashy.

Here are eight of our favorite everyday swaps:

1. Friendsheep Dryer Balls - Replace traditional dryer sheets with these dryer balls that are made without chemicals and conserve energy. Not only do these also reduce dry time by 20% but they're so cute and come in an assortment of patterns!

Package Free Shop

2. Last Swab - Replacement for single use plastic cotton swabs. Nearly 25.5 billion single use swabs are produced and discarded every year in the U.S., but not this one. It lasts up to 1,000 uses as it's able to be cleaned with soap and water. It also comes in a biodegradable, corn based case so you can use it on the go!

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Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash
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Glenda moved to Houston from Ohio just before the pandemic hit. She didn't know that COVID-19-related delays would make it difficult to get her Texas driver's license and apply for unemployment benefits. She quickly found herself in an impossible situation — stranded in a strange place without money for food, gas, or a job to provide what she needed.

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Glenda sat in her car for 20 minutes outside of the building, trying to muster up the courage to get out and ask for help. She'd never been in this situation before, and she was terrified.

When she finally got out, she encountered Eva Thibaudeau, who happened to be walking down the street at the exact same time. Thibaudeau is the CEO of Temenos CDC, a nonprofit multi-unit housing development also founded by the Rasmuses, with a mission to serve Midtown Houston's homeless population.

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via Twins Trust / Twitter

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Simon and Graeme Berney-Edwards, a gay married couple, from London, England both wanted to be the biological father of their first child.

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This election might be giving a lot of people stress, but it's also giving us memes. While Thursday's debate didn't have anything nearly as spectacular as the fly - which will now get a whole chapter in future history books just so there's enough room to cover even a fraction of the jokes – people were still able to have fun with it.

During the debate, Joe Biden accidentally misspoke and referred the Proud Boys as "poor boys." "He has made everything worse across the board. He said about the poor boys, the last time we were on stage here, he said 'I tell them to stand down and stand ready,'" Biden said during Thursday night's debate. "Come on. This guy is a dog whistle about as big as a foghorn," Biden said.

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