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Lyndsey Scott has a resume that almost sounds too impressive to be true: she’s works as a tutor on Apple’s iOS team and is a software engineer. Full stop. That’s a career worthy of serious accolades.

But she’s also a celebrated Victoria’s Secret model.

And it’s her vocation as a model that led some deeply misguided sexist trolls to question the 31-year-old’s qualifications.

Big mistake.

Scott didn’t just “own” these would-be bullies, she did it with the facts. They say sunlight is the best disinfectant and her truth rays sent the cockroaches of the internet scurrying for cover.

Here’s how it all started: An Instagram post headlined ‘This Victoria’s Secret model can program code in Python, C++, Java, MIPS, and Objective-C.’ came under attack on a Reddit forum.

A few anonymous users questioned whether Scott was the real deal, mansplaining their way past any research or actual knowledge by assuming she wasn’t a “real” coder and was simply using the term to give herself an elevated sense of importance.

One user openly speculated that she had simply run a simple program that “programmed” the words “Hello, world.”

Another even more condescending user tried to explain the complexities of coding, something he assumed Scott clearly didn’t have a functioning grasp of:

“Anyone can write code, not many people can write code well though. Languages are easy to learn, but scalable, readable, maintainable, efficient code is not.”

Of course, the problem with all of this is that Scott is in fact an extremely qualified coder.

And while she noted that she normally chooses to not engage with hateful strangers online, in this case she felt it was important to clear the air. So, Scott jumped into the comments section of the Coding Engineer Instagram account and took on the role of anti-troll, writing:

I have 27481 points on StackOverflow; I’m on the iOS tutorial team for RayWendelich.com; I’m the Lead iOS software engineer for @RallyBound, the 841st fastest growing company in the US according to @incmagazine, I have a Bachelor’s degree from Amherst where I double majored in computer science and theater, and I’m able to live my life doing everything I love. Looking at these comments I wonder why 41% of women in technical careers drop out because of a hostile work environment 🤔 #gofigure

In a follow-up post on her own Instagram account, Scott wrote:

“I normally try to ignore negatively, but decided to jump into the comment section of this one. Not trying to brag lol, just stating facts in the hope I’ll convince at least one negative commenter that programmers can come in all shapes, sizes, genders, races, etc. so they’ll think twice before doubting other women and girls they encounter in tech.”

Scott shared her message across Twitter as well, where it was welcomed with open arms by other women in tech:

Shutting down sexist trolls is a worthy task in and of itself.

But like Scott said, reminding women that they have every right to succeed in their chosen field is an act worth celebrating.

Photo: Jason DeCrow for United Nations Foundation

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