Scientists just outlined a 'dire scenario' for the future. Here's how to prevent it.

Antarctica's ice sheet is melting at a rate that's becoming more and more frightening.

In new research published in the latest issues of Nature, a group of scientists report that "the melt rate has tripled in the past decade." From 2012 to 2017, Antarctica lost 219 billion tons of ice annually due to rising ocean temperatures.


Experts believe that humans may have no more than a decade to drastically reduce greenhouse gas emissions in order to avoid the devastating effects of climate change.

In what's referred to as "the dire scenario," ocean waters could rise as high as half a meter by 2070.

If the temperature rises about 3.5 degrees celsius (which is considered more than catastrophic by the United Nations), the Antarctic Ocean would become inhospitable to the shelled creatures that live there, entire industries — especially fishing — would be disrupted, wildlife would die in large numbers, and it would create undoable damage to coasts and property. In fact, many places in the world are already experiencing some of these effects, along with record heat and extreme weather.

Yikes, right?

Here's the thing: We've known for a long time that the ice in and around the coldest continent on Earth has been melting faster than it should, but scientists say we have some time — even if not a lot — to change.

Some progress has been made: The ozone hole is healing, more green buildings are being built, and more and more new renewable energy laws are being passed around the world.

But experts insist that as citizens of this planet, we can and must do more.

Though there's not much that can be done about the ice that's already melted, researchers say if governments and citizens work together we can slow the effects of global warming. But it can't be something we put off until tomorrow.

Yes, the "dire scenario" is terrifying, but there's also hope.

The earth can survive many things. It has before. Instead, the question we must ask is: How long the planet will be habitable for humans and animals if we don't work harder to take care of it?

If governments continue to work together to reduce air pollution, the Antarctica that will exist in 2070 could look pretty similar to how it does right now. And without the dramatic rise in temperature, some species would still lose numbers, but others would adapt, meaning the damage would be less severe.

That's why we all need to do our part to save the planet. It's not just the only one currently fit for human life — it's our home. And the blows that climate change has already dealt should be a call to action.

Call your representatives, vote for greener initiatives in local elections, make sure that your voice is heard when climate change is discussed by the people around you. Go as green as you can, every day. Here are just a few ideas!

Your individual efforts might feel small, but our collective action could lead to huge positive consequences.

More
Instagram / Frères Branchiaux Candle Co.

Three young Maryland brothers who started a candle company to buy new toys now donate $500 a month from their successful business to help the homeless.

Collin, 13, Ryan, 11, and Austin, 8, Gill founded "Frères Branchiaux," which is French for Gill Brothers, after their mom told them they could either get a job or start a business if they wanted more video games and Nerf guns.

"They surprised me when they started a business and they started selling at their baseball and football games and they've moved on to a vending truck," Celena Gill told Good Morning America.

The three of them have been making the candles in their Indian Head home for the last two years and business is booming, with 36 stores carrying the boys' products and a deal with Macy's in the works. They sell nearly 400 candles a month, priced from $18 to $36, along with other products like diffuser oils, room sprays, soap, bath bombs and salts, according to the Washington Post.


Keep Reading Show less
Business
Sony Pictures Entertainment/YouTube


A BEAUTIFUL DAY IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD - Official Trailer (HD) www.youtube.com

As a child, I spent countless hours with Mister Rogers. I sang along as he put on his cardigan and sneakers, watched him feed his fish, and followed his trolley into the Land of Make Believe. His show was a like a calm respite from the craziness of the world, a beautiful place where kindness always ruled. Even now, thinking about the gentle, genuine way he spoke to me as a child is enough to wash away the angst of my adult heart.

Fred Rogers was goodness personified. He dedicated his life not just to the education of children, but to their emotional well-being. His show didn't teach us letters and figures—he taught about love and feelings. He showed us what community looks like, what accepting and including different people looks like, and what kindness and compassion look like. He saw everyone he met as a new friend, and when he looked into the camera and said, "Hello, neighbor," he was sincerely speaking to every person watching.

Keep Reading Show less
Culture
via ManWhoHasItAll

Recently, Upworthy shared a tweet thread by author A.R. Moxon who created a brilliant metaphor to help men understand the constant anxiety that potential sexual abuse causes women.

He did so by equating sexual assault to something that men have a deep-seeded fear of: being kicked in the testicles.

HBO didn't submit 'Brienne' from Game of Thrones for an Emmy. So, she did it herself.

An anonymous man in England who goes by the Twitter handle @manwhohasitall has found a brillintly simple way of illustrating how we condescend to women by speaking to men the same way.

Keep Reading Show less
popular