One year after this heartwarming video and we're still crazy in love with love.
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A year ago, a bunch of skeletons kissed, hugged, danced, and brought a world of people together.

It was a visual reminder that underneath it all, we're so much alike.


That's why millions of people watched the video on Facebook and shared its lasting message, "Love has no labels," far and wide.

But that powerful message of equality, diversity, and kindness didn't end one year ago, it was only the beginning.

Watch this video produced by Upworthy with the Ad Council to see how far love has come in just one year. And scroll down to read six reasons we're so crazy in love with love.

In the past year, we've seen countless examples of people loving and caring for one another.

Sometimes they're family, and other times they're just friends, co-workers, or even complete strangers.

But regardless of their circumstances, people are setting aside biases to reach out and connect with one another, without reservation or condition. It's bringing us closer and making us stronger and more empathetic. To put it plainly, ain't love grand?

So, we've compiled a bunch of bookmarkable moments site-wide to explain six reasons we're so in love with love.

1. Forget the "norms" because love has no gender.

We see it in the beautiful reactions to the Supreme Court lifting the ban on same-sex marriage. And the happy, sharp-dressed newlyweds celebrating their love in unique and unexpected ways.

2. We're all in this together because love has no border or race.

When a group of refugees from Syria arrived in Glasgow, Scotland, they received a warm welcome on the front page of the newspaper. And when a white supremacist welcomes empathy and love into his life, he can build connections and make inroads with the people he once despised.

3. No matter what pundits or presidential candidates want us to think, love has no religion or creed.

Love is veterans offering to protect a young Muslim girl when she's worried about being taken from her home in the wake of xenophobia. And it's people of all faiths rallying behind a community in crisis in the wake of the attack in Charleston.

4. We can love what we do, and who we do it for.

Like the elementary school assistant principal who sings and dances with the students every morning to get their day started on the right note. Or the teachers who go above and beyond the job description to bring meaning and fun to every lesson. And we can't forget the grandmother who has nothing but love for her granddaughter who just came out.

5. We can even show love to complete strangers.

Like the nurse who makes fanciful wigs out of yarn for kids with cancer. And the rap star raising money to buy winter coats for people in need. And, of course, the helpful volunteers who brighten days and lift spirits by spending time at their local senior center.

6. Because love is found at work, at home, and in our communities.

Like the woman who bought all the tickets from fans angry about the Oakland A's LGBT Pride Night and donated them to an LGBTQ youth community center. Or the Canadian town that hosted an early Christmas parade to bring joy to a little boy who was dying from a brain tumor.

This Valentine's Day, and every day, it's important to look for love wherever you are.

Because love is more than chocolates and flowers. Love is an action word.

It is commitment to show compassion, kindness, and dedication to each other. If candlelit dinners and sappy poems aren't your thing, don't worry. You can live love every day, in your own way.

And you definitely should.

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Courtesy of Tiffany Obi
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With the COVID-19 pandemic upending her community, Brooklyn-based singer Tiffany Obi turned to healing those who had lost loved ones the way she knew best — through music.

Obi quickly ran into one glaring issue as she began performing solo at memorials. Many of the venues where she performed didn't have the proper equipment for her to play a recorded song to accompany her singing. Often called on to perform the day before a service, Obi couldn't find any pianists to play with her on such short notice.

As she looked at the empty piano at a recent performance, Obi's had a revelation.

"Music just makes everything better," Obi said. "If there was an app to bring musicians together on short notice, we could bring so much joy to the people at those memorials."

Using the coding skills she gained at Pursuit — a rigorous, four-year intensive program that trains adults from underserved backgrounds and no prior experience in programming — Obi turned this market gap into the very first app she created.

She worked alongside four other Pursuit Fellows to build In Tune, an app that connects musicians in close proximity to foster opportunities for collaboration.

When she learned about and applied to Pursuit, Obi was eager to be a part of Pursuit's vision to empower their Fellows to build successful careers in tech. Pursuit's Fellows are representative of the community they want to build: 50% women, 70% Black or Latinx, 40% immigrant, 60% non-Bachelor's degree holders, and more than 50% are public assistance recipients.

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