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A year ago, a bunch of skeletons kissed, hugged, danced, and brought a world of people together.

It was a visual reminder that underneath it all, we're so much alike.


That's why millions of people watched the video on Facebook and shared its lasting message, "Love has no labels," far and wide.

But that powerful message of equality, diversity, and kindness didn't end one year ago, it was only the beginning.

Watch this video produced by Upworthy with the Ad Council to see how far love has come in just one year. And scroll down to read six reasons we're so crazy in love with love.

In the past year, we've seen countless examples of people loving and caring for one another.

Sometimes they're family, and other times they're just friends, co-workers, or even complete strangers.

But regardless of their circumstances, people are setting aside biases to reach out and connect with one another, without reservation or condition. It's bringing us closer and making us stronger and more empathetic. To put it plainly, ain't love grand?

So, we've compiled a bunch of bookmarkable moments site-wide to explain six reasons we're so in love with love.

1. Forget the "norms" because love has no gender.

We see it in the beautiful reactions to the Supreme Court lifting the ban on same-sex marriage. And the happy, sharp-dressed newlyweds celebrating their love in unique and unexpected ways.

2. We're all in this together because love has no border or race.

When a group of refugees from Syria arrived in Glasgow, Scotland, they received a warm welcome on the front page of the newspaper. And when a white supremacist welcomes empathy and love into his life, he can build connections and make inroads with the people he once despised.

3. No matter what pundits or presidential candidates want us to think, love has no religion or creed.

Love is veterans offering to protect a young Muslim girl when she's worried about being taken from her home in the wake of xenophobia. And it's people of all faiths rallying behind a community in crisis in the wake of the attack in Charleston.

4. We can love what we do, and who we do it for.

Like the elementary school assistant principal who sings and dances with the students every morning to get their day started on the right note. Or the teachers who go above and beyond the job description to bring meaning and fun to every lesson. And we can't forget the grandmother who has nothing but love for her granddaughter who just came out.

5. We can even show love to complete strangers.

Like the nurse who makes fanciful wigs out of yarn for kids with cancer. And the rap star raising money to buy winter coats for people in need. And, of course, the helpful volunteers who brighten days and lift spirits by spending time at their local senior center.

6. Because love is found at work, at home, and in our communities.

Like the woman who bought all the tickets from fans angry about the Oakland A's LGBT Pride Night and donated them to an LGBTQ youth community center. Or the Canadian town that hosted an early Christmas parade to bring joy to a little boy who was dying from a brain tumor.

This Valentine's Day, and every day, it's important to look for love wherever you are.

Because love is more than chocolates and flowers. Love is an action word.

It is commitment to show compassion, kindness, and dedication to each other. If candlelit dinners and sappy poems aren't your thing, don't worry. You can live love every day, in your own way.

And you definitely should.

This article originally appeared on November 11, 2015


Remember those beloved Richard Scarry books from when you were a kid?

Like a lot of people, I grew up reading them. And now, I read them to my kids.

The best!

If that doesn't ring a bell, perhaps this character from the "Busytown" series will. Classic!

Image via

Scarry was an incredibly prolific children's author and illustrator. He created over 250 books during his career. His books were loved across the world — over 100 million were sold in many languages.

But here's something you may not have known about these classics: They've been slowly changing over the years.

Don't panic! They've been changing in a good way.

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Photo by Maxim Hopman on Unsplash

The Sam Vimes "Boots" Theory of Socioeconomic Unfairness explains one way the rich get richer.

Any time conversations about wealth and poverty come up, people inevitably start talking about boots.

The standard phrase that comes up is "pull yourself up by your bootstraps," which is usually shorthand for "work harder and don't ask for or expect help." (The fact that the phrase was originally used sarcastically because pulling oneself up by one's bootstraps is literally, physically impossible is rarely acknowledged, but c'est la vie.) The idea that people who build wealth do so because they individually work harder than poor people is baked into the American consciousness and wrapped up in the ideal of the American dream.

A different take on boots and building wealth, however, paints a more accurate picture of what it takes to get out of poverty.

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"Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (1937) and actor Peter Dinklage.

On Tuesday, Upworthy reported that actor Peter Dinklage was unhappy with Disney’s decision to move forward with a live-action version of “Snow White and the Seven Drawfs” starring Rachel Zegler.

Dinklage praised Disney’s inclusive casting of the “West Side Story” actress, whose mother is of Colombian descent, but pointed out that, at the same time, the company was making a film that promotes damaging stereotypes about people with dwarfism.

"There's a lot of hypocrisy going on, I've gotta say, from being somebody who's a little bit unique," Dinklage told Marc Maron on his “WTF” podcast.

"Well, you know, it's really progressive to cast a—literally no offense to anybody, but I was a little taken aback by, they were very proud to cast a Latino actress as Snow White," Dinklage said, "but you're still telling the story of 'Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.' Take a step back and look at what you're doing there.”

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