More

These 12 gorgeous photos of couples celebrate the magic of love across race, gender, age, and size.

Catalyst features couples you wouldn't see in your mother's wedding mag.

These 12 gorgeous photos of couples celebrate the magic of love across race, gender, age, and size.

When it comes to weddings, Carly Romeo has seen it all.

Between her gigs as a wedding photographer and planning her own wedding ceremony, she's noticed something:

The average wedding magazine doesn't reflect the diversity of what couples actually look like. At all.



Carly with her partner, Travis, on their love party day. Photo by PJ Sykes.

Which is why Carly teamed up with self-described "progressive wedding coordinator" Liz Susong to launch Catalyst Wedding Magazine. Tired of all the focus on spending a ton of money or losing weight for The Dress, they decided to make a different wedding magazine entirely.

They wanted to create a magazine that focuses on love — and celebrating that love in ways that are as unique as every couple.

Catalyst aims to feature beautiful imagery while staying true to its mission of reflecting the people that the wedding industry is actually serving.

And it definitely delivers. Check out these gorgeous photos of loving couples in an upcoming issue:

1. Elaine and Vikas had a hybrid Hindu wedding that reflected both of their cultures.

All photos used with permission. Photo by Rebecca Caridad.


2. Sarah-Jean and Kent got hitched in a small, intimate courthouse and Irish pub celebration with their closest family and friends.

Photo by Brandi Potter Photography.

3. After 30 years together, Annie and Janice finally got to tie the knot in a ceremony at their home.

Photo by Erika Nizborski.

4. Alexa and Stephen fell in love after working together at a Virginia Beach Ruby Tuesday.

Photo by Imani Fine Art Photography.

5. Jazmin and Ben displayed their love of beer and baseball with brewery tours and a food truck at their wedding.

Photo by From the Hip Atlanta.

6. Crystal and Jayleen celebrated their love with a wintertime wedding in Amish country.

Photo by Two Spoons Photography.

7. Stephanie and Felipe had their reception first, celebrating before a sweet backyard ceremony.

Photo by Hidden Exposure Photography.

8. Chicagoans Alissa and Bethany traveled to L.A. for an engagement shoot in the Arts District.

Photo by Elmer Escobar Photography.

9. Maria and Lisa got hitched shortly after marriage equality came to Illinois, holding a backyard ceremony with friends and family.

Photo by Oriana Koren.

10. John and Matt surprised their guests when they revealed their goodbye party was actually a wedding.

Photo by Pangtography.

11. Katie and Albert didn't need to get married to celebrate their love and commitment publicly.

Photo by Two Spoons Photography.

12. Hairstylist Brandy and DJ Conley celebrated their love outdoors in a small ceremony with loved ones.

Photo by A Lovely Photo.

Heart-meltingly sweet, right?

It's so important for us to see what couples actually look like. With all the wedding-themed TV shows, magazines, blogs, and Pinterest boards available, there's no shortage of content out there to serve as a guide for couples who want to get married. Unfortunately, the inspiration that makes the cut doesn't tend to reflect the reality for most Americans.

It's probably not a surprise to say that the wedding industry has a media diversity problem. A 2013 University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire study of five bridal magazines found that the almost all the women were thin and light-skinned. And when it came to the covers? Only white women made the cut. All of the couples were heterosexual and very few were interracial.

So thanks to Catalyst for showing us what we really look like. Here's hoping other folks in the wedding industry take a page out of their magazine...

Like what you see? Order your own copy of Catalyst Wedding Magazine (and preorder the second issue!).

True
Back Market

Between the new normal that is working from home and e-learning for students of all ages, having functional electronic devices is extremely important. But that doesn't mean needing to run out and buy the latest and greatest model. In fact, this cycle of constantly upgrading our devices to keep up with the newest technology is an incredibly dangerous habit.

The amount of e-waste we produce each year is growing at an increasing rate, and the improper treatment and disposal of this waste is harmful to both human health and the planet.

So what's the solution? While no one expects you to stop purchasing new phones, laptops, and other devices, what you can do is consider where you're purchasing them from and how often in order to help improve the planet for future generations.

Keep Reading Show less
via Haley McGuire / TikTok

About a quarter of people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are nonverbal, and while that number seems high, there's been sharp decline from a generation ago when the number was closer to half.

This positive shift is due to an increase in studies on ASD which have resulted in more effective therapeutic strategies.

Children with ASD are often nonverbal, but many go onto acquire language skills. Up to 70% of nonverbal children become fluent speakers or can use simple phrases.

Keep Reading Show less
True

$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


Biases, stereotypes, prejudices—these byproducts of the human brain's natural tendency to generalize and categorize have been a root cause of most of humanity's problems for, well, pretty much ever. None of us is immune to those tendencies, and since they can easily slip in unnoticed, we all have to be aware of where, when, and how they impact our own beliefs and actions.

It also helps when someone upends a stereotype by saying or doing something unexpected.

Fair or not, certain parts of the U.S. are associated with certain cultural assumptions, perhaps none more pinholed than the rural south. When we hear Appalachia, a certain stereotype probably pops up in our minds—probably white, probably not well educated, probably racist. Even if there is some basis to a stereotype, we must always remember that human beings can never be painted with such broad strokes.

Enter Tyler Childers, a rising country music star whose old-school country fiddling has endeared him to a broad audience, but his new album may have a different kind of reach. "Long Violent History" was released Friday, along with a video message to his white rural fans explaining the culminating track by the same name. Watch it here:

Keep Reading Show less

Strangers helping out strangers is always a heartwarming thing. But when lots and lots of strangers come together to help one individual who needs and deserves a little hand up, we get a much-needed flood of warm, gushy best-of-humanity feelings.

Such is the case of an 89-year-old pizza delivery man, Derlin Newey, who happened to win the hearts of the Valdez family after he delivered them a pizza and struck up a conversation. Newey had no idea his friendly demeanor and obviously stellar work ethic would soon make him a TikTok star, nor did he expect an outpouring of donations from perfect strangers that relieve some of his burden.

Carlos Valdez shared the initial pizza delivery video, taken through the family's Nest doorbell, on TikTok about a week ago. "Hello, are you looking for some pizza?" Newey says when they answer the door, then chats with them for a while.


Keep Reading Show less