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These 12 gorgeous photos of couples celebrate the magic of love across race, gender, age, and size.

Catalyst features couples you wouldn't see in your mother's wedding mag.

When it comes to weddings, Carly Romeo has seen it all.

Between her gigs as a wedding photographer and planning her own wedding ceremony, she's noticed something:

The average wedding magazine doesn't reflect the diversity of what couples actually look like. At all.



Carly with her partner, Travis, on their love party day. Photo by PJ Sykes.

Which is why Carly teamed up with self-described "progressive wedding coordinator" Liz Susong to launch Catalyst Wedding Magazine. Tired of all the focus on spending a ton of money or losing weight for The Dress, they decided to make a different wedding magazine entirely.

They wanted to create a magazine that focuses on love — and celebrating that love in ways that are as unique as every couple.

Catalyst aims to feature beautiful imagery while staying true to its mission of reflecting the people that the wedding industry is actually serving.

And it definitely delivers. Check out these gorgeous photos of loving couples in an upcoming issue:

1. Elaine and Vikas had a hybrid Hindu wedding that reflected both of their cultures.

All photos used with permission. Photo by Rebecca Caridad.


2. Sarah-Jean and Kent got hitched in a small, intimate courthouse and Irish pub celebration with their closest family and friends.

Photo by Brandi Potter Photography.

3. After 30 years together, Annie and Janice finally got to tie the knot in a ceremony at their home.

Photo by Erika Nizborski.

4. Alexa and Stephen fell in love after working together at a Virginia Beach Ruby Tuesday.

Photo by Imani Fine Art Photography.

5. Jazmin and Ben displayed their love of beer and baseball with brewery tours and a food truck at their wedding.

Photo by From the Hip Atlanta.

6. Crystal and Jayleen celebrated their love with a wintertime wedding in Amish country.

Photo by Two Spoons Photography.

7. Stephanie and Felipe had their reception first, celebrating before a sweet backyard ceremony.

Photo by Hidden Exposure Photography.

8. Chicagoans Alissa and Bethany traveled to L.A. for an engagement shoot in the Arts District.

Photo by Elmer Escobar Photography.

9. Maria and Lisa got hitched shortly after marriage equality came to Illinois, holding a backyard ceremony with friends and family.

Photo by Oriana Koren.

10. John and Matt surprised their guests when they revealed their goodbye party was actually a wedding.

Photo by Pangtography.

11. Katie and Albert didn't need to get married to celebrate their love and commitment publicly.

Photo by Two Spoons Photography.

12. Hairstylist Brandy and DJ Conley celebrated their love outdoors in a small ceremony with loved ones.

Photo by A Lovely Photo.

Heart-meltingly sweet, right?

It's so important for us to see what couples actually look like. With all the wedding-themed TV shows, magazines, blogs, and Pinterest boards available, there's no shortage of content out there to serve as a guide for couples who want to get married. Unfortunately, the inspiration that makes the cut doesn't tend to reflect the reality for most Americans.

It's probably not a surprise to say that the wedding industry has a media diversity problem. A 2013 University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire study of five bridal magazines found that the almost all the women were thin and light-skinned. And when it came to the covers? Only white women made the cut. All of the couples were heterosexual and very few were interracial.

So thanks to Catalyst for showing us what we really look like. Here's hoping other folks in the wedding industry take a page out of their magazine...

Like what you see? Order your own copy of Catalyst Wedding Magazine (and preorder the second issue!).

Health

A child’s mental health concerns shouldn’t be publicized no matter who their parents are

Even politicians' children deserve privacy during a mental health crisis.

A child's mental health concerns shouldn't be publicized.

Editor's Note: If you are having thoughts about taking your own life, or know of anyone who is in need of help, the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline is a United States-based suicide prevention network of over 200+ crisis centers that provides 24/7 service via a toll-free hotline with the number 9-8-8. It is available to anyone in suicidal crisis or emotional distress.


It's an unspoken rule that children of politicians should be off limits when it comes to public figure status. Kids deserve the ability to simply be kids without the media picking them apart. We saw this during Obama's presidency when people from both ends of the political spectrum come out to defend Malia and Sasha Obama's privacy and again when a reporter made a remark about Barron Trump.

This is even more important when we are talking about a child's mental health, so seeing detailed reports about Ted Cruz's 14-year-old child's private mental health crisis was offputting, to say it kindly. It feels icky for me to even put the senator's name in this article because it feels like adding to this child's exposure.

When a child is struggling with mental health concerns, the instinct should be to cocoon them in safety, not to highlight the details or speculate on the cause. Ever since the news broke about this child's mental health, social media has been abuzz, mostly attacking the parents and speculating if the child is a member of the LGBTQ community.

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Science

Dyslexic plumber gets a life-changing boost after his friend built an app that texts for him

It uses AI to edit his work emails into "polite, professional-sounding British English."

via Pixabay

An artist's depiction of artificial intelligence.

There is a lot of mistrust surrounding the implementation of artificial intelligence these days and some of it is justified. There's reason to worry that deep-fake technology will begin to seriously blur the line between fantasy and reality, and people in a wide range of industries are concerned AI could eliminate their jobs.

Artists and writers are also bothered that AI works on reappropriating existing content for which the original creators will never receive compensation.

The World Economic Forum recently announced that AI and automation are causing a huge shake-up in the world labor market. The WEF estimates that the new technology will supplant about 85 million jobs by 2025. However, the news isn’t all bad. It also said that its analysis anticipates the “future tech-driven economy will create 97 million new jobs.”

The topic of AI is complex, but we can all agree that a new story from England shows how AI can certainly be used for the betterment of humanity. It was first covered by Tom Warren of BuzzFeed News.

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This article originally appeared on 04.15.19


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Famous writers shared their book signing woes with a disheartened new author.

Putting creative work out into the world to be evaluated and judged is nerve-wracking enough as it is. Having to market your work, especially if you're not particularly extroverted or sales-minded, is even worse.

So when you're a newly published author holding a book signing and only two of the dozens of people who RSVP'd show up, it's disheartening if not devastating. No matter how much you tell yourself "people are just busy," it feels like a rejection of you and your work.

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