Muslim women and allies stood hand in hand to condemn the attack in London.

Wearing blue to symbolize peace, nearly 100 women — mostly Muslim — stood hand in hand forming a human chain along Westminster Bridge.

Women stand on London's Westminster Bridge on March 26 to honor the victims of the March 22 attack. Photo by Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images.

On the same bridge just days prior, Khalid Masood drove his car into pedestrians, injuring dozens and killing four people before being killed by police.


But for five minutes on March 26, 2017, the iconic London span was mostly silent. No chants. No bullhorns. No signs or banners. Simply women and girls joining forces, the sounds of a city in mourning, and people doing their best to carry on in the wake of tragedy.

Photo by Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images.

The event was organized by Women's March on London after one Muslim woman was unfairly maligned for looking indifferent to victims in the aftermath of the attack.

A photo of the woman on the phone walking past an injured victim circulated online. But her detractors only saw a single frame in what was assuredly a shocking and distressing morning.

The woman, who has chosen to remain anonymous, released a statement to TellMAMA, a organization that supports victims of anti-Muslim violence in the U.K.

"What the image does not show is that I had talked to other witnesses to try and find out what was happening, to see if I could be of any help, even though enough people were at the scene tending to the victims. I then decided to call my family to say that I was fine and was making my way home from work, assisting a lady along the way by helping her get to Waterloo station."

For the Muslim women who took part in the public show of solidarity, the event was overwhelmingly emotional.

This was an attack in their figurative backyard, perpetrated by an extremist whose actions don't reflect the religion he claims to represent. Sarah Waseem described the powerful experience in a recent blog post.

Photo by Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images.

"As I stood on the bridge, and the minutes moved on, a sense of calm come over me. Suddenly it did not matter anymore what people might be thinking. I was proud to be there – to show passers-by that, I as a Muslim cared about what had happened in my city, and that I condemned it. I hoped that with my companions, we had in some small measure, showed that terrorism could not divide us from them, that we were at one with them and that perhaps we could reassure them that Islam was not the enemy."

Muslim women and girls often bear the brunt of anti-Muslim rhetoric and violence.

In the wake of terror attacks, women wearing hijabs are often targets for harassment, threats, and violence. It's especially maddening (given the number or terror attacks in majority-Muslim countries) because many victims of terror are Muslim themselves. But it doesn't stop some people from demonizing and being fearful of those who practice Islam.

Photo by Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images.

Just last week, a Muslim woman was followed while driving, blocked from parking her car, and received threats of assault. Another Muslim woman in Charlotte was feeding her infant when a man pointed a gun at her. Attacks like this against individuals and mosques are unacceptable and sadly may be on the rise after the election. This is unacceptable.

But no matter your faith or background, there are lots of ways to help and show your support.

Donate to the Council on American Islamic Relations. Reach out to a mosque in your community to let them know you will not stand for bigotry or anti-Muslim rhetoric. If they host any public events, make a point to attend with your friends or family. Protest, demonstrate, and call your representatives to let them know what you think about pending travel bans or immigration orders. Follow Muslim thinkers, writers, artists, and scholars on Twitter or Facebook. Listen and pass the mic to Muslim voices.

Because in London and at home, #WeStandTogether.  

Flowers are left on Westminster Bridge in memory of those who died in the terror attack. Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images.

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Shopping sustainably is increasingly important given the severity of the climate crisis, but sometimes it's hard to know where to turn. Thankfully, Amazon is making it a little easier to browse thousands of products that have one or more of 19 sustainability certifications that help preserve the natural world.

The online retailer recently announced Climate Pledge Friendly, a program to make it easier for customers to discover and shop for more sustainable products. To determine the sustainability of a product, the program partnered with third-party certifications, including governmental agencies, nonprofits, and independent labs.

With a selection of items spanning grocery, household, fashion, beauty, and personal electronics, you'll be able to shop more sustainably not just for the holiday season, but throughout the year for your essentials, as well.

You can browse all of the Climate Pledge Friendly products here, labeled with an icon and which certification(s) they meet. To get you on your way to shopping more sustainably, we've rounded up eight of our favorite Climate Pledge Friendly-products that will make great gifts all year long.

Amazon

Jack Wolfskin Women's North York Coat

Give the gift of warmth and style with this coat, available in a variety of colors. Sustainability is built into all Jack Wolfskin products and each item comes with a code that lets you trace back to its origins and understand how it was made.

Bluesign: Bluesign products are responsibly manufactured by using safer chemicals and fewer resources, including less energy, in production.


Amazon

Amazon All-new Echo Dot (4th Gen)

For the tech-obsessed. This Alexa smart speaker, which comes in a sleek, compact design, lets you voice control your entertainment and your smart home as well as connect with others.

Reducing CO2: Products with this certification reduce their carbon footprint year after year. Certified by the Carbon Trust.


Amazon

Burt's Bees Family Jammies Matching Holiday Organic Cotton Pajamas

Get into the holiday spirit with these fun matching PJs for the whole family. Perfect for pictures that even Fido can get in on.

Global Organic Textile Standard: This certifies each step of the organic textile supply chain against strict ecological and social standards. Each product with this certification contains 95%-100% organic content.

Amazon

Naturistick 5-Pack Lip Balm Gift Set

With 100% natural ingredients that are gentle on ultra-sensitive lips, this gift is a great gift for the whole family.

Compact by Design (Certified by Amazon): Products with this certification are packaged without excess air and water, which reduces the carbon footprint of shipping and packaging.


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Arus Women's GOTS Certified Organic Cotton Hooded Full Length Turkish Bathrobe

For those who love to lounge around, this full-length organic cotton bathrobe is the way to go. Available in five different colors, it has comfortable cuffed sleeves, a hood, pockets, and adjustable belt.

Global Organic Textile Standard: This certifies each step of the organic textile supply chain against strict ecological and social standards. Each product with this certification contains 95%-100% organic content.

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L'Occitane Extra-Gentle Vegetable Based Soap

This luxe soap, made with moisturizing shea butter and scented with verbena, is perfect for the self-care obsessed.

Compact by Design (Certified by Amazon): Products with this certification are packaged without excess air and water, which reduces the carbon footprint of shipping and packaging.

Amazon

Goodthreads Men's Sweater-Knit Fleece Long-Sleeve Bomber

For the fashionable men in your life, this fashion-forward knit bomber is an excellent choice. The sweater material keeps it cozy and warm, while the bomber jacket-cut, zip front, and rib-trim neck make it look elevated.

Recycled Claim Standard 100: Products with this certification use materials made from at least 95% recycled content.

Amazon

All-new Fire TV Stick with Alexa Voice Remote

Make it even easier to access your favorite movies and shows this holiday season. The new Fire TV Stick lets you use your voice to search across apps. Plus it controls the power and volume on your TV, so you'll never need to leave the couch! Except for snacks.

Reducing CO2: Products with this certification reduce their carbon footprint year after year. Certified by the Carbon Trust.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.