+
upworthy
Pop Culture

Mom posts rant about the chaos of school right before the holidays and parents are relating

Parents—which holiday-related school event did you forget this year?

darryl predergast tiktok

"You're welcome."

South Carolina mom Darryl Prendergast’s hilarious TikTok PSA has become an anthem for parents everywhere who find themselves in the throes of chaos right before school lets out for the holidays.

In her video, Prendergast rattles off:

"I don't know who needs to hear this, but your kid has some kind of pajama-wearing, winter fest, book swap, Secret Santa, cookie-sharing, Twelve Days of Christmas, Spirit Week-something happening at school tomorrow that you need to get ready for.”

"And P.S.," she added in her comments section, “there's a sign-up genius somewhere out there with your name on it. Go get your item."

Let’s just say that parents knew this year-end struggle all too well, and were quick to commiserate.


“Pj day and book swap today two different kids,” one person wrote.

Another added, “Just saw this..and sure enough, tomorrow is a holiday party that I signed up to bring the cookies for. Good thing it’s going to be a snow day!”

@d_prend40 #momlife #momsindecember #momsatchristmas #momsover35 #oldmillenialmoms #momsover40club #momhumor ♬ original sound - Darryl Prendergast

Some parents admitted that perhaps some of this last-minuteness could be blamed on the kiddos.

“And my kid won’t mention it until about 9 pm the night before…” one person commented.

Prendergast shared in an interview with TODAY what prompted her to make a video in the first place. “I had just gotten an email from my child’s middle school about a Holiday Spirit Week that entailed various outfit changes,” she said. “There is an ice cream truck one day — don’t forget to send money — Wednesday is 'Red and White' Day, Thursday is 'White Out Day' and Friday is 'Pajama Day.' Oh, and there's a teacher's luncheon.”

She also shared that as an educator, she previously only knew the other side of end-of-year anxiety. "Before I had kids, I was the one emailing parents to send donations to build gingerbread houses, not realizing how busy parents are," she admitted.

Ultimately, Prendergast hopes that her relatable post encourages other parents to “stop and laugh” even during the craziness, "and appreciate that one day we’re going to miss this."

So, to all the parents out there scrambling to make magic happen for their little ones … Merry Christmas. And Godspeed.

With the new year comes plenty of resolutions we all vow to keep up with the best of intentions. But by February 1, our resolve has often waned as life gets in the way and things go back to how they were. What we all need a little more of is motivation.

When we participate in something collectively, it’s easier to meet goals and maintain the enthusiasm to get things done. While the support of a friend or two is great, imagine having the power of an entire online community cheering you on and offering advice along the way.

This is where the Daily Decluttering Challenge Facebook group comes in. This online community offers easy-to-implement advice for decluttering, organizing, and cleaning up your home and your life with support from 125,000 members.

“By building a network of people who can support and encourage you along the way, you can make progress towards your goals faster and more effectively. Remember, no one achieves success alone, and having a strong support system can make the difference in a goal set versus a goal achieved,” says Kristin Burke, a goal achievement coach.

In addition to tips for tidying up around the house, members share advice on how to tackle one thing at a time, where to donate excess items, and what they do to exercise more willpower to avoid buying new things.

For anyone hoping to declutter their lives in the new year, this Facebook group has the perfect challenge to get you started.

Keep ReadingShow less
Pop Culture

People share the 18 things that are a 'subtle sign' someone is really smart

"They effortlessly communicate complex concepts in a simple way."

Albert Einstein

One of the strangest things about being human is that people of lesser intelligence tend to overestimate how smart they are and people who are highly intelligent tend to underestimate how smart they are.

This is called the Dunning-Kruger effect and it’s proven every time you log onto Facebook and see someone from high school who thinks they know more about vaccines than a doctor.

The interesting thing is that even though people are poor judges of their own smarts, we’ve evolved to be pretty good at judging the intelligence of others.

Keep ReadingShow less

Mike McLoughlan realized something very important about his dishwasher.

No one likes doing the dishes, but the tedious chore is made much easier when using a dishwasher. However, an alarming amount of people have reported that their dishwashers can actually make the job harder because they don't properly fit their dishes.

And that's where Twitter user Mike McLoughlin (@zuroph) comes in.

Back in January, McLoughlin made an observation about his dishwasher that would change the way he does dishes forever. For a decade, the Irishman thought that the bottom rack of his washer simply was too small for his large dinner plates. Then he made an amazing discovery:

Keep ReadingShow less
Pop Culture

Optical illusion that looks like a person with two dogs has people totally tripping

It takes a while to see it, but there are not two dogs in the photo.

Where is the third dog in this photo?

Optical illusions are wild. The way our brains perceive what our eyes see can be way off base, even when we're sure about what we're seeing.

Plenty of famous optical illusions have been created purposefully, from the Ames window that appears to be moving back and forth when it's actually rotating 360 degrees to the spiral image that makes Van Gogh's "Starry Night" look like it's moving.

But sometimes optical illusions happen by accident. Those ones are even more fun because we know they aren't a result of someone trying to trick our brains. Our brains do the tricking all by themselves.

Keep ReadingShow less
Family

Harvard psychologists have been studying what it takes to raise 'good' kids. Here are 6 tips.

Help unlock your child's best self with a few tried-and-true strategies.

Kids playing baseball with a slide into second.


A lot of parents are tired of being told how technology is screwing up their kids.

Moms and dads of the digital age are well aware of the growing competition for their children's attention, and they're bombarded at each turn of the page or click of the mouse with both cutting-edge ideas and newfound worries for raising great kids.

Keep ReadingShow less
Parenting

10 ways kids appear to be acting naughty but actually aren't

Many of kids' so-called 'bad' behaviors are actually normal developmental acts of growing up.

Photo by Allen Taylor on Unsplash
two toddler pillow fighting

When we recognize kids' unwelcome behaviors as reactions to environmental conditions, developmental phases, or our own actions, we can respond proactively, and with compassion.

Here are 10 ways kids may seem like they're acting "naughty" but really aren't. And what parents can do to help.

Keep ReadingShow less
Identity

10 Black women sat in first class on an airplane and it revealed a lot about race in America

"This weekend I went on a girls trip. 10 Black women flying first class. People literally could not process how it was possible."

via Angie Jones / Twitter and Matt Blaze / Flickr

Software developer Angie Jones' recent girls trip revealed that America still has a long way to go when it comes to race.

To most, that's not surprising. But what's unique is how the specific experience Jones and her friends went through revealed the pervasive way systemic racism still runs through our culture.

Jones is the Senior Director of Developer Relations at Applitools, holds 26 patented inventions in the United States of America and Japan, and is an IBM Master Inventor.

Keep ReadingShow less