Millennial couple asks neighbors to provide 'homemade granola' after giving birth. It backfired.
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Welcoming a baby into your family completely upends your daily routine. Tasks you'd otherwise consider essential — cleaning, cooking, bathing, sleeping, playing Fortnite for hours — become practical impossibilities.

You may well find yourself running on four hours of sleep, wearing yesterday's clothes with burp-puke on them, struggling to scrub dishes or prepare a simple meal.

Surviving the earliest days of parenthood requires a support system — indeed, there's a whole field of etiquette surrounding the assistance of new parents. But a pair of millennials in Philadelphia posted a "meal train" request on NextDoor that pushed one man over the edge. Fortunately for the rest of us, he aired his grievance publicly on Twitter — and gave the Internet some mind-blowing #content in the process.


I have so many thoughts. "Teetering on a fence of emotions" is sheer fuckboi poetry, a phrasing that arises from years of pulling out and refusing to pay for half the Plan B.

Re: the food specifications, who's making "lamb meatball stew with orzo" for themselves, let alone two strangers? The list resembles a celebrity nutritionist's approved meals that you'd see in US Weekly but I have a feeling even Jessica Biel would be like, "This is too much. I'll just have a green juice."

The Twitterverse felt similarly.

Naturally, there were dissenting opinions.

But most people agreed the post smacked of entitlement.

Godspeed, you crazy kids! I'm rooting for you despite your grave mistake. The NextDoor post wasn't great, either.

This article was originally published by our partners at someecards.

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This year more than ever, many families are anticipating an empty dinner table. Shawn Kaplan lived this experience when his father passed away, leaving his mother who struggled to provide food for her two children. Shawn is now a dedicated volunteer and donor with Second Harvest Food Bank in Middle Tennessee and encourages everyone to give back this holiday season with Amazon.

Watch the full story:

Over one million people in Tennessee are at risk of hunger every day. And since the outbreak of COVID-19, Second Harvest has seen a 50% increase in need for their services. That's why Amazon is Delivering Smiles and giving back this holiday season by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Second Harvest to feed those hit the hardest this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local food bank or charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your selected charity.

via Brittany Kinley / Facebook

Brittany Kinley, a mother from Mansfield, Texas, had a hilarious mom fail her and she's chalking it up to being just another crazy thing that happened in 2020.

When Kinley filled out the order form for her son Mason's kindergarten class pictures, there was an option to have his name engraved into the photos. But Kinley wasn't interested in having her son's name on the photos so she wrote "I DON'T WANT THIS" on the box.

Well, it appears as though she should have left the box blank because the computer or incredibly literal human that designed the photographs wrote "I DON'T WANT THIS" where mason's name should be.

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A lot of people here are like family to me," Michelle says about Bread for the City — a community nonprofit located in Washington DC that provides local residents with food, clothing, health care, social advocacy, and legal services. And since the pandemic began, the need to support organizations like Bread for the City is greater than ever, which is why Amazon is Delivering Smiles to local charities across the country this holiday season.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.

Somewhere in Salt Lake City, a Girl Scout is getting allll the good mojo from The People of the Internet.

Over the weekend, Eli McCann shared a story of an encounter at a Girl Scout cookie stand that has people throwing their fists in the air and shouting, YES! THAT'S HOW IT'S DONE. (Or maybe that's just me. But I'm guessing most of the 430,000 people who liked his story had a similar reaction.)

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via UDOT / Facebook

In December 2018, The Utah Department of Transportation opened the largest wildlife overpass in the state, spanning 320 by 50 feet across all six lanes of Interstate 80.

Its construction was intended to make traveling through the I-80 corridor in Summit County safer for motorists and the local wildlife.

The Salt Lake Tribune reports that there were over 100 animal incidents on the interstate since 2016, giving the stretch of highway the unfortunate nickname of "Slaughter Row."

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