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Meet Mr. and Mr. McBride — Nickelodeon's first same-sex parents.

Other cartoon networks, take note from Nickelodeon.

If you haven't watched Nickelodeon cartoons in a while, here's a spectacular reason to jump back on the bright orange wagon:

The cartoon series "The Loud House" is about to become the first Nickelodeon cartoon to debut a same-sex couple.

Let's get an animated cheer for progress!


GIF by Nickelodeon Animation Studios/Tumblr, used with permission.

The cartoon features a family named The Louds (appropriate based on the title and above GIF), specifically their son Lincoln — the only boy in a family of 10 girls. So many different girl characters in one cartoon? Well, that's fantastic, for starters.

However, the episode entitled "Overnight Success", which is set to air Wednesday, July 20, could rocket the series to legendary status.

That's right, kids — those are two openly gay, interracial parents dropping their son off at a sleepover. But the best part isn't the fact that they're gay — it's how little attention the show draws to that fact. Well, except for the less-than-subtle announcement "Time to make history!" But can you really blame them for that? It is, after all, a huge moment for the network, and a little attention should be paid.


This is another major step forward in the history of gay characters stepping into the spotlight on television.

LGBTQ characters could be spotted on a number of animated programs, one example dating as far back as 1990, when a guest character named Karl (voiced by Harvey Fierstein) shares a kiss with Homer in an episode entitled "Simpson and Delilah." The episode racked up over 29.6 million viewers and is often touted as one of the best "Simpsons" episodes of all time.

Homer and Karl. Photo by The Simpsons/YouTube.

"The Simpsons" played a pivotal role in bringing gay characters into the foreground, as did "Family Guy" and "South Park," but "The Loud House's" move to show a regular same-sex couple may make even more of a difference.

It's one of the first shows aimed at young children to do so, and as such, it's teaching kids just how normal it is to have gay parents. These characters are no different than heterosexual parents: overprotective and overly emotional at milestones like sleepovers. But the more those messages can be shown on television, the better.

Case in point, these appreciative fans:




Let's hope other kid-friendly cartoons soon follow in "The Loud House's" footsteps. While this particular TV family is neurotic and even a little crazy, it's great to have one more example of families — of all shapes and sizes — to remind us that love is love.

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The United Nations is marking its 75th anniversary at a time of great challenge, including the worst global health crisis in its history. Will it bring the world closer together? Or will it lead to greater divides and mistrust?

Share your vision for shaping the future: take this 1-minute survey. Your responses to this survey will inform global priorities now and going forward.

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When I found out I was pregnant in October 2018, I had planned to keep the news a secret from family for a little while — but my phone seemed to have other ideas.

Within just a few hours of finding out the news, I was being bombarded with ads for baby gear, baby clothes and diapers on Facebook, Instagram and pretty much any other site I visited — be it my phone or on my computer.

Good thing my family wasn't looking over my shoulder while I was on my phone or my secret would have been ruined.

I'm certainly not alone in feeling like online ads can read your mind.

When I started asking around, it seemed like everyone had their own similar story: Brian Kelleher told me that when he and his wife met, they started getting ads for wedding rings and bridal shops within just a few weeks. Tech blogger Snezhina Piskov told me that she started getting ads for pocket projectors after discussing them in Messenger with her colleagues. Meanwhile Lauren Foley, a writer, told me she started getting ads for Happy Socks after seeing one of their shops when she got off the bus one day.

When online advertising seems to know us this well, it begs the question: are our phones listening to us?

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Arnold Schwarzenegger is a badass in the movies, but he's increasingly building a reputation as a heroic "action star" in real life. Only, instead of dropping ungodly amounts of fake bullets into his enemies, Schwarzenegger has been dropping rhetorical bombs against his political opponents while building intellectual and emotional bridges to those who disagree with him but still have open hearts and minds.

The most recent example found Arnold responding to a comment someone made on Facebook. On the surface, that may sound like just about the least unique or original jumping off point for a story.




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LEGO recently unveiled plans to roll out a set of bricks for use by the visually impaired. Using each LEGO brick's 3-by-2 grid of raised dots, the educational toy includes bricks imprinted with every letter, number, and mathematical symbol in the braille alphabet.

Why LEGOs? Well, the American Printing House for the Blind recently found that only 8.4 percent of visually impaired children read Braille, as opposed to 50 percent in 1960. With the advent of audio books and voice-to-text technology, reading and writing are becoming lost arts for the visually impaired, often for lack of resources or time — modern braille education methods include expensive "Braille writers" or a slate and stylus, both of which create text that is difficult for students to edit or erase. LEGO bricks are not only swappable, but children are already familiar with their mechanics!

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