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After a deadly attack in London yesterday that claimed three victims' lives plus the attacker's life and injured 40 others, Mayor Sadiq Khan urged London's residents to come together and resist the temptation to give into fear.

Photo by Jack Taylor/Getty Images.

"I want to reassure all Londoners, and all our visitors, not to be alarmed," Khan said in a statement. Our city remains one of the safest in the world. London is the greatest city in the world and we stand together in the face of those who seek to harm us and destroy our way of life.


Around the same time, Donald Trump Jr. was criticizing the mayor on Twitter, digging up comments he made in an interview last September, which Trump interpreted as an attempt to downplay extremist violence.

Whether Trump had Khan right or not, there is evidence to suggest that the way government and media outlets react to violent attacks can amplify their power and incentivize the next one if not handled responsibly.

After the 2015 shooting of a Virginia journalist, reporter Zeynep Tufekci argued in The New York Times that relentless coverage of deadly assaults motivates future "lone wolf" violence. She cited an FBI analysis, a study by Arizona State researchers, and another study from the American Psychiatric Association, all of which conclude that single-minded public obsession with isolated violent events creates greater risk of copycat attacks.

In an analysis of the tactics of global extremist groups published last year, former Amnesty International policy director for terrorism, counter-terrorism, and human rights Tom Parker described provoking an overreaction as "Terrorism 101." When democratic governments take extreme measures in the wake of attacks, like increasing surveillance or over-policing specific ethnic groups, he argues, they often divide their own societies, turning victims of the crackdown from opponents to sympathizers and sympathizers to supporters.

In contrast, many Londoners are reacting by doing exactly what the mayor suggested: staying alert but otherwise keeping calm and carrying on.

"Today we meet as normal," Prime Minister Theresa May said, addressing a session of Parliament the day after the attacks, "As generations have done before us, and as future generations will continue to do, to deliver a simple message: We are not afraid."

Many residents echoed that message, pasting the phrase onto the iconic image of the city's Underground and spreading it across social media.

In an interview with CNN the day after the tragedy, Khan emphasized that his city would not be cowed.

Mayor Sadiq Khan. Photo by Rob Stothard/Getty Images.

"Parliament is returning to normal today," the mayor said. "City hall is returning to normal today. Tourists are returning to London today. Businesses are returning to normal today. Just the thing that the terrorists hate."

Feeling grief and anger after an attack doesn't have to mean giving terrorists more power than they deserve — which, of course, is none at all.

Sowing fear and chaos is the central tactic in the violent extremist playbook. Londoners are showing that the best way to fight back is to feel their feelings while maintaining their characteristic stiff upper lip.

Yesterday, a depraved, violent maniac tried to break a city's spirit. For now, the people of London are not letting him win.

It's a model a weary world can take to heart.

via FIRST

FIRST students compete in a robotics challenge.

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Societies all over the world face an ever-growing list of complex issues that require informed solutions. Whether it’s addressing infectious diseases, the effects of climate change, supply chain issues or resource scarcity, the world has an immediate need for problem-solvers with science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) skills.

Here in the United States, we’re experiencing a shortage of much-needed STEM workers, and forward-thinking organizations are stepping up to tap into America’s youth to fill the void. As the leading youth-serving nonprofit advancing STEM education, FIRST is an important player in this arena, and its mission is to inspire young people aged 4 to 18 to become technology leaders and innovators capable of addressing the world’s pressing needs.

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Joy

1991 blooper clip of Robin Williams and Elmo is a wholesome nugget of comedic genius

Robin Williams is still bringing smiles to faces after all these years.

Robin Williams and Elmo (Kevin Clash) bloopers.

The late Robin Williams could make picking out socks funny, so pairing him with the fuzzy red monster Elmo was bound to be pure wholesome gold. Honestly, how the puppeteer, Kevin Clash, didn’t completely break character and bust out laughing is a miracle. In this short outtake clip, you get to see Williams crack a few jokes in his signature style while Elmo tries desperately to keep it together.

Williams has been a household name since what seems like the beginning of time, and before his death in 2014, he would make frequent appearances on "Sesame Street." The late actor played so many roles that if you were ask 10 different people what their favorite was, you’d likely get 10 different answers. But for the kids who spent their childhoods watching PBS, they got to see him being silly with his favorite monsters and a giant yellow canary. At least I think Big Bird is a canary.

When he stopped by "Sesame Street" for the special “Big Bird's Birthday or Let Me Eat Cake” in 1991, he was there to show Elmo all of the wonderful things you could do with a stick. Williams turns the stick into a hockey stick and a baton before losing his composure and walking off camera. The entire time, Elmo looks enthralled … if puppets can look enthralled. He’s definitely paying attention before slumping over at the realization that Williams goofed a line. But the actor comes back to continue the scene before Elmo slinks down inside his box after getting Williams’ name wrong, which causes his human co-star to take his stick and leave.

The little blooper reel is so cute and pure that it makes you feel good for a few minutes. For an additional boost of serotonin, check out this other (perfectly executed) clip about conflict that Williams did with the two-headed monster. He certainly had a way of engaging his audience, so it makes sense that even after all of these years, he's still greatly missed.

Marlon Brando on "The Dick Cavett Show" in 1973.

Marlon Brando made one of the biggest Hollywood comebacks in 1972 after playing the iconic role of Vito Corleone in Francis Ford Coppola’s “The Godfather.” The venerable actor's career had been on a decline for years after a series of flops and increasingly unruly behavior on set.

Brando was a shoo-in for Best Actor at the 1973 Academy Awards, so the actor decided to use the opportunity to make an important point about Native American representation in Hollywood.

Instead of attending the ceremony, he sent Sacheen Littlefeather, a Yaqui and Apache actress and activist, dressed in traditional clothing, to talk about the injustices faced by Native Americans.

She explained that Brando "very regretfully cannot accept this generous award, the reasons for this being … the treatment of American Indians today by the film industry and on television in movie reruns, and also with recent happenings at Wounded Knee."

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Co-sleeping isn't for everyone.

The marital bed is a symbol of the intimacy shared between people who’ve decided to be together 'til death they do part. When couples sleep together it’s an expression of their closeness and how they care for one another when they are most vulnerable.

However, for some couples, the marital bed can be a warzone. Throughout the night couples can endure snoring, sleep apnea, the ongoing battle for sheets or circadian rhythms that never seem to sync. If one person likes to fall asleep with the TV on while the other reads a book, it can be impossible to come to an agreement on a good-night routine.

Last week on TODAY, host Carson Daly reminded viewers that he and his wife Siri, a TODAY Food contributor, had a sleep divorce while she was pregnant with their fourth child.

“I was served my sleep-divorce papers a few years ago,” he explained on TODAY. “It’s the best thing that ever happened to us. We both, admittedly, slept better apart.”

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