Chari Hawkins - The Pursuit of Progress | On www.youtube.com

On the surface, Team USA heptathlete Chari Hawkins has it all: She's aiming for a spot in the 2020 Summer Games in Tokyo, she's mentoring young female athletes, and recently became sponsored by On running shoes.

But her path to success hasn't been an easy one. Hawkins sat down with Upworthy to talk about how she works to overcome self-doubt and anxiety, body issues facing female athletes, and what messages she's hoping to pass to other young women.

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Inclusivity

If you've ever wondered why gay people keep "shoving their sexuality down your throat" (which sounds a bit, uh, sexual in itself?), Olympian Gus Kenworthy has a tweet you might want to see.

Kenworthy, a skiier, is fresh off the games in Pyeongchang, where he and figure skating sensation Adam Rippon made history as some of the first openly gay members of Team USA's Olympic squad (Kenworthy won a silver medal during the 2014 Sochi games, but wasn't out as gay just yet).

Like a lot of Olympic athletes, Kenworthy posted a lot of photos to his social media accounts during his downtime — and yes, some mentioned that he was happy he could represent America as himself.  It was pretty sweet!

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The year was 1904, and it was the United States’ first time hosting the Olympic Games.

This should have been an exciting moment, but America’s inaugural games in St. Louis were actually kind of a mess.

St. Louis wasn’t even supposed to be the host city of the games — Chicago was.

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Four years ago, Olympic freestyle skier Gus Kenworthy hit the slopes in Sochi, Russia, with purpose, eventually landing on the podium with a silver medal. But he wasn’t completely satisfied.

After coming out in 2015, Kenworthy, 26, revealed to ESPN magazine the main reason he was disappointed with his performance: “I never got to be proud of what I did in Sochi because I felt so horrible about what I didn’t do. I didn’t want to come out as the silver medalist from Sochi. I wanted to come out as the best freeskier in the world.”

All Olympians dream of winning gold medals, but to Kenworthy, it was about more than marking personal athletic accomplishment. He’s eager to represent the LGBTQ community in America on the top of the podium as an openly gay man.

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