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weight loss

A woman working out at the gym wearing headphones.

In 2018, author James Clear released “Atomic Habits,” a book about making significant changes through building small habits. The book's takeaway is that you don’t have to commit to drastic, overnight changes to improve yourself. You can do so by slowly working your way towards a goal.

"All big things come from small beginnings,” Clear writes in the book. “The seed of every habit is a single, tiny decision. But as that decision is repeated, a habit sprouts and grows stronger. Roots entrench themselves and branches grow. The task of breaking a bad habit is like uprooting a powerful oak within us. And the task of building a good habit is like cultivating a delicate flower one day at a time."

TikTokker Ashie Adams has a similar theory she calls the Lazy Girl Fitness hack. She says people can create a regular fitness routine by breaking a trip to the gym down into 2 distinct events instead of one that feels overwhelming.


“It’s my secret formula for making becoming a gym girlie happen,” she explains. "When you start working out, actually getting to the gym is 90% of the battle. You have to treat the action of getting to the gym and the action of working out as 2 completely separate habits.”

I never hear anyone talk about this so its my burden to bear i guess 🫶🏻🫶🏻🫶🏻 

@ashieadams

I never hear anyone talk about this so its my burden to bear i guess 🫶🏻🫶🏻🫶🏻 #fitness #fitnesstips #fitnesshacks #weightloss #weightlosstransformation #weightlossprogress #lifting

Ashie then breaks down the two distinct tasks: “Getting to the gym is a matter of waking up early, finding the time to do it, finding your workout clothes [and] getting out of the door on time,” she says in a video with over 500,00 views. “Working out is a matter of having the motivation and having the right workout program. But one cannot exist without the other, so the first habit to develop is just getting to the gym.”

The Utah mother says that for the first 30 days, people should focus on getting to the gym and little else. If you leave the car and enter the gym try walking on the treadmill for 15 to 20 minutes. Then, slowly, once you’ve mastered getting to the gym, you can start developing a workout routine.

Ashie says that this 2-step technique allowed her to build a positive gym habit without getting overwhelmed and quitting after a few days.

“Nine times out of 10, when I tried and failed to create the habit of going to the gym, it was because I was completely overwhelming myself,” she says in the video. “I wasn’t trying to do one new thing, which is work out. I was doing 40 things, [which] is genuinely too much for one person to undertake all in one go.”

The 2-step Lazy Girl Fitness hack doesn’t just sound easy and effective, it’s based on solid scientific principles. According to neurology researchers, micro-habits are one of the easiest ways to develop new routines. Micro-habits are small, regular behavioral changes that are easy to build into a routine because they don’t encourage psychological resistance and won’t disappear as willpower erodes.

Eventually, these new behaviors, such as driving to the gym or having a glass of water when you wake up every morning, become hard-wired into the brain, and you’ll start doing them without thinking. That’s when the real change begins to take place.

Creative Commons

Fat shaming has never been in style, and yet, the fashion industry seems to have it on lock.

Many Forever 21 customers have reported they've received samples of Atkins' new line of lemon bars with their plus-sized clothing orders. The bars are touted as a way to "treat yourself without worrying about your carb count." Yikes.

Needless to say, the free sample did notgo over well. Many customers feel as if the fast fashion retailer is trying to subtly tell them they need to lose weight.

RELATED: Macy's pulls plates from their stores for sending a 'toxic message'




Forever 21 responded, saying they aren't trying to target people who ordered plus-sized clothes. Everyone got the Atkins bar samples, and they're in fact not trying to tell people, "Hey, you could really stand to lose a few pounds." The retailer has since apologized for including the bar in their shipments.

"From time to time, Forever 21 surprises our customers with free test products from third parties in their e-commerce orders. The freebie items in question were included in all online orders, across all sizes and categories, for a limited time and have since been removed," Forever 21 said in a statement, per Buzzfeed News. "This was an oversight on our part and we sincerely apologize for any offense this may have caused to our customers, as this was not our intention in any way."

RELATED: Man exposes the absurdity of sexist marketing by creating shirts that label men like we do women

Regardless, it's still not a good look. The presence of the bar insinuates there's something wrong with the customer – regardless of their size. Opening a box to find a diet bar is going to make people feel like trash about their figure, even if there's nothing wrong with them.

We love the fun of getting surprised with free samples with our clothes, but Forever 21 should think harder about what they include next time.

via Fat Girl Fed Up

According to US News & World Report, over 80% of people fail at their New Year's resolutions by February.

Author and clinical psychologist Joseph Luciani says it's because we eventually lose motivation and that outside-in solutions rarely work unless we've changed on the inside.

"Unless you first change your mind, don't expect your health goals to materialize," Luciani says. "As the saying goes, it's not the horse that draws the cart, it's the oats. It's not the gym, Pilates class or diet that will change you – it's your mind."


Lexi and Danny Reed, newlyweds from Indiana clearly changed their collective minds and it resulted in the couple losing a combined 400 pounds. It all started on New Year's Day in 2017.

"We had no idea exactly how we were going to lose the weight or if we would make it - but we were determined to try," Lexi wrote. "We knew that together anything was possible."

In just one year and six months, 500-pound Lexi lost 303 pounds because she fell in love with taking care of herself.

"I found the secret to weight loss was working hard in the gym 5x a week for 30 mins or moving more," she wrote on Instagram. "I found that I could take the unhealthy foods I loved and make them into healthy versions. I found that by focusing on each day not the 300+lbs I had to lose the days added up & I was making progress."

The couple's love for one another helped them achieve their goals.

"I am forever grateful for the way he's loved me no matter what size and never asked me to change," Lexi wrote on Instagram. He treated me the same exact way when I was heavy that he does not that I'm healthy. When I agreed to be his wife I agreed to spending the rest of my life with him and I'm so glad we have lost 392 lbs together and gained many years to do just that."

After her stunning weight loss, Lexi began sharing the inspiring photos of her and her husband's journey on an Instagram page called Fat Girl Fed Up and it's earned over a million followers.

Earlier this year, Lexi had to have surgery to remove painful excess skin on her body.

The couple's dramatic transformation shows just how powerful it is when people support one another in their goals. It's a good reminder to take a look at the people in our lives and ask if they are helping us become the person we want to be or are they holding us back.

Can you believe there are people who still haven't watched the new “Queer Eye” reboot on Netflix?

Image via “Queer Eye.”

If that’s you, you need to get on it!


The new series is fun. It’s optimistic. It’s bridging the gap between liberals and conservatives (believe it or not). And it has a whole lot of heart, too.

At its core, “Queer Eye” is about finding the pep in your step via confidence and self-love — not just a new haircut. And that’s something Jonathan Van Ness, the show’s grooming expert, knows all about.

Photo by Neilson Barnard/Getty Images.

On April 17, Van Ness shared photos on Instagram in recognition of #TransformationTuesday.

While the two side-by-side pics may look like your standard before-and-after shot focused on weight loss, Van Ness noted the photos weren’t about valuing one physical appearance or body size over the other. They were about the power of seeing yourself as “lovely and gorge” no matter what.

A post shared by Jonathan Van Ness (@jvn) on

In the caption, the “Queer Eye” star noted he fell into some unhealthy habits after his stepdad passed away about five years ago. “I didn’t like how I felt or looked,” he wrote.

But today, he explained, he’s not trying to block out those difficult memories or use that image as a measuring stick to mark any kind of fitness or nutrition progress. He’s focused on celebrating the old pic just as much as he’s celebrating the new one.

“It’s so important for me to look back and tell that man from five years ago he was lovely and gorge,” he wrote. “I can celebrate where I am now as long as I send love to the ‘me’s along the way.”

A post shared by Jonathan Van Ness (@jvn) on

A lot of #TransformationTuesday posts focus on pounds, muscle mass, and the existence (or absence) of abs.

And you know what? If you’ve set fitness or nutrition goals for yourself and are reaching them, good for you. You deserve to pat yourself on the back.

But Van Ness’ post serves as a great reminder that internal transformations are the more critical ones. And there’s a whole lot of power in learning to love every “you” that led the way to today. ❤