Lizzo, reality show, dancer

Lizzo at the Grammys in 2020.

What’s not to love about Lizzo? She’s talented in multiple ways, has impeccable fashion sense and encourages people to love themselves on a regular basis, so it’s no surprise that she’s taking her talents to the small screen. Lizzo recently created a reality show with Amazon Prime Video titled “Lizzo’s Watch Out for the Big Grrrls,” where she is on the hunt with her choreographer and touring team to find new backup dancers for her upcoming tour.

This isn’t just any search for backup dancers though, it's a search for backup dancers in larger bodies and other varying body types and a celebration of dancers of all sizes. Lizzo posted to her Instagram about the excitement behind the show and the viral TikTok dance it created. In true Lizzo fashion, she took the opportunity to shut down part of Hollywood Boulevard and dance it out in the street with some of the dancers from the show.


Body positivity and the health at every size (HAES) movement have been steadily gaining traction and Lizzo has been unapologetic about how she dresses her body and the level of confidence she has. It is refreshing to see the landscape begin to change to include bodies that are more representative of the country in which we live. Lizzo’s fierce defiance of the societal norm of keeping larger bodies covered up has emboldened other women and some men to do the same.

A show like "Lizzo’s Watch Out for the Big Grrrls" will continue to provide representation for body types outside of what society deems appropriate and healthy. It will show that bodies can move at every size and stand on a public stage to show the world what they can do. Lizzo often has dancers of various sizes on tour with her, but this will be the first time we'll get to see the hiring process happening in real time. Dancers have come from all over to audition for this show and be cast.

It’s no wonder that Lizzo decided to stop her car on Hollywood Boulevard to dance to the viral TikTok dance that bears the same title of her reality show. In her post on Instagram, the singer wrote “We shut DOWN Hollywood blvd (IN HEELS) last night in celebration of WATCH OUT FOR THE BIG GRRRLS—it’s been crazy watching the world do our dance.” The video and images included in the post show several of her talented dancers of all sizes recreating the viral dance created by Jemel McWilliams.

Body positivity is for everyone, but it’s especially important for people with large bodies. Representation in the media means people that have the lived experience of being larger in America can see the possibilities they have because they see someone else doing it. Representation goes so much further than feminism or race. It matters for everyone, but especially those who belong to marginalized groups.

Lizzo’s show is much needed and the ripples will continue far after the show wraps.

Joy

Meet Eva, the hero dog who risked her life saving her owner from a mountain lion

Wilson had been walking down a path with Eva when a mountain lion suddenly appeared.

Photo by Didssph on Unsplash

A sweet face and fierce loyalty: Belgian Malinois defends owner.

The Belgian Malinois is a special breed of dog. It's highly intelligent, extremely athletic and needs a ton of interaction. While these attributes make the Belgian Malinois the perfect dog for police and military work, they can be a bit of a handful as a typical pet.

As Belgian Malinois owner Erin Wilson jokingly told NPR, they’re basically "a German shepherd on steroids or crack or cocaine.”

It was her Malinois Eva’s natural drive, however, that ended up saving Wilson’s life.

According to a news release from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wilson had been walking down a path with Eva slightly ahead of her when a mountain lion suddenly appeared and swiped Wilson across the left shoulder. She quickly yelled Eva’s name and the dog’s instincts kicked in immediately. Eva rushed in to defend her owner.

It wasn’t long, though, before the mountain lion won the upper hand, much to Wilson’s horror.

She told TODAY, “They fought for a couple seconds, and then I heard her start crying. That’s when the cat latched on to her skull.”

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Joy

50-years ago they trade a grilled cheese for a painting. Now it's worth a small fortune.

Irene and Tony Demas regularly traded food at their restaurant in exchange for crafts. It paid off big time.

Photo by Gio Bartlett on Unsplash

Painting traded for grilled cheese worth thousands.

The grilled cheese at Irene and Tony Demas’ restaurant was truly something special. The combination of freshly baked artisan bread and 5-year-old cheddar was enough to make anyone’s mouth water, but no one was nearly as devoted to the item as the restaurant’s regular, John Kinnear.

Kinnear loved the London, Ontario restaurant's grilled cheese so much that he ordered it every single day, though he wouldn’t always pay for it in cash. The Demases were well known for bartering their food in exchange for odds and ends from local craftspeople and merchants.

“Everyone supported everyone back then,” Irene told the Guardian, saying that the couple would often trade free soup and a sandwich for fresh flowers. Two different kinds of nourishment, you might say.

And so, in the 1970s the Demases made a deal with Kinnear that he could pay them for his grilled cheese sandwiches with artwork. Being a painter himself and part of an art community, Kinnear would never run out of that currency.

Little did Kinnear—or anyone—know, eventually he would give the Demases a painting worth an entire lifetime's supply of grilled cheeses. And then some.

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Sandy Hook school shooting survivors are growing up and telling us what they've experienced.

This story originally appeared on 12.15.21


Imagine being 6 years old, sitting in your classroom in an idyllic small town, when you start hearing gunshots. Your teacher tries to sound calm, but you hear the fear in her voice as she tells you to go hide in your cubby. She says, "be quiet as a mouse," but the sobs of your classmates ring in your ears. In four minutes, you hear more than 150 gunshots.

You're in the first grade. You wholeheartedly believe in Santa Claus and magic. You're excited about losing your front teeth. Your parents still prescreen PG-rated films so they can prepare you for things that might be scary in them.

And yet here you are, living through a horror few can fathom.

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