Lizzo responded to the criticism over her thong dress with a message of self love

Even though 68% of women in America where size 14 or above, plus sized women tend to draw more heat for the outfits that they wear, especially if those outfits are even remotely racy. Earlier this week, Lizzo was spotted at a LA Lakers game wearing the dress heard round the internet. Dubbed the "thong dress," Lizzo's t-shirt dress was straightforward in the front, but the back featured cutouts featuring her thong and fishnet stockings.

During the game, Lizzo twerked when the Laker Girls danced to her song "Juice," giving the crowd a full view of her ensemble.


Lizzo TWERKS IN THONG For LeBron, & Karl Anthony Towns At Staples Center #Lizzo #LeBron #TruthHurts youtu.be


Some people were critical of Lizzo's choice of outfit, calling it unsanitary at best, and wildly inappropriate at medium-worst.





RELATED: A plus-sized fashion blogger was shamed for dressing like Meghan Markle. Her response was perfect.

However, others jumped to Lizzo's defense, with some pointing out that there's a double standard when it comes to beauty. Lizzo wouldn't be receiving the same criticism if she had a different body type.








But Lizzo doesn't care what the world thinks about her thong dress. She came to her own defense when she posted an Instagram live video with her thoughts about other people's thoughts about her dress.


"Like, this is who I've always been," Lizzo says in the video. "Now everyone's looking at it and your criticism can just remain your criticism. Your criticism has no effect on me. Negative criticism has no stake in my life, no control over my life, over my emotions. I'm the happiest I've ever been, I'm surrounded by love."

Lizzo is all about self-love, and wants others to love themselves as well. "Who I am and the essence of me and the things that I choose to do as a grown-ass woman can inspire you to do the same," Lizzo says in the video "You don't have to be like me. You need to be like you. And never ever let somebody stop you or shame you from being yourself."

RELATED: Lisa Kudrow opened up about the constant body shaming she and her co-stars experienced on the set of Friends.

Lizzo had a final message to those who didn't like her dress. "I just wanna spread that love and also spread these cheeks," she said. "And you know what, if you really don't like my a**, you can kiss it. 'Cause kissing it makes it go away, I promise."

Lizzo also posted a video of Rihanna twerking while wearing a see-through dress, calling it her "inspiration."

Lizzo was recently named TIME Magazine's entertainer of the year, so it looks like she's getting the last laugh.

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