Comparing yourself to other women is unhealthy, counterproductive, and also, unfortunately, a way of life for some people.

We shouldn’t feel like someone’s perfections automatically mean that we’re flawed, and yet, it happens to the best of us.

Lisa Kudrow recently opened up about her body image issues when she was on Friends, and how she would compare herself to Jennifer Aniston and Courteney Cox. It wasn’t just teenage girls in the 90s who wanted to be skinny like the Friends. It turns out, women on Friends also wanted to be skinny like Friends.


Kudrow told Marc Maron on his WTF podcast that she felt uncomfortable because she was taller than her costars on Friends. “You see yourself on TV and it’s that, ‘Oh, my God, I’m just a mountain of a girl,’” Kudrow said. “I’m already bigger than Courteney and Jennifer — bigger, like my bones feel bigger. I just felt like this mountain of a woman next to them.”

Kudrow also opened up about losing weight “on purpose” while she was on Friends, and would then receive compliments on her slimmer frame regardless of how she lost her pounds. “Unfortunately for a woman, if you’re underweight, you look good. And that’s all I ever got,” she said. Kudrow also pointed out that being skinny didn’t equate to being healthy. “When I was too thin, I was sick all the time. A cold, sinus infection… I was always sick.” Complimenting someone who is slender yet sick can encourage unhealthy habits.

But now, Kudrow feels more comfortable in her body. “I have a whole battle all the time,” she said. “I end up with, ‘So what? So, alright. You’re older. That’s a good thing. Why is that a bad thing?'” We’re glad to hear the story has a happy ending.

Women have a lot of pressure to be skinny, and it’s often fueled by seeing skinny women on TV. However, it’s important to remember those skinny women on TV also have their own pressures to maintain and unnatural and unhealthy weight. The grass isn’t always greener, and at the end of the day, you should be happy with yourself as you are.

By now, most of us know better than to get our hopes up about our favorite celebrities. We've watched too many beloved household names fall from grace, and even those who seem delightful in their personas have been outed as kinda terrible people in private. (We'll always have Mister Rogers. And I'm still holding out hope for Tom Hanks, all kooky conspiracy theories aside.)

But a Twitter thread that largely flew under the radar this week has highlighted the apparently universal kindness of comedian and late night talk show host Seth Meyers.

Sara Benincasa wrote:

"When certain pals battered & bruised by an otherwise abusive industry mention Seth Meyers, they go into an enchanted fugue state and talk like they got to work with the love child of Glinda the Good Witch and some benevolent supergenius golden retriever, IDK, he sounds nice!"

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Melanie Cholish/Facebook

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While that sounds awful, it's important to know that trafficking children in the US is not all of that. I can't say it never is—I don't know. What I do know is most young trafficked children aren't sitting in a basement tied up. They have families, and someone—usually in their family—is trafficking them.

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This week, a private Christian college in a town near where I live announced that is planning to resume in-person classes this fall. The school has decided that students will not be required to wear masks, despite the fact that the town itself has a mask mandate for all public spaces. "No riots. No masks. In person. This fall," the college wrote in a Facebook post advertising the school last month.

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