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Kevin Bacon is using his 'Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon' fame to promote social distancing
via Kevin Bacon / Instagram

Actor Kevin Bacon has starred in countless box-office hits including "Footloose," "A few Good Men," and "Apollo 13." He's been in so many films that he's almost as well known for being prolific as he is for his performances.

Bacon has worked with so many people in entertainment, he became the subject of a game where people would try to connect one Hollywood person to Kevin Bacon within six steps or degrees.


Example:

Elvis Presley:

Elvis Presley was in Change of Habit (1969) with Ed Asner

Ed Asner was in JFK (1991) with Kevin Bacon


In 1996, the game became a book and Bacon probably hasn't lived a day without hearing about it since. Which has to be annoying.

Bacon is using the fact that he's known for his connections to spread awareness at our own interconnectedness during the coronavirus pandemic. The virus can easily spread from person to person so the more humans that come in contact, the greater the pandemic will spread.

The actor posted a video on Instagram encouraging people to stay home during the pandemic and to ask others to do so as well through #IStayHomeFor.

"Hi, folks. You know me, right? I'm technically only six degrees away from you," he said in a video

"Right now, like people around the world, I'm staying home, because it saves lives and it is the only way we're going to slow down the spread of this coronavirus," he continued. "Because the contact that you make with someone, who makes contact with someone else, that may be what makes somebody's mom or grandpa or wife sick."

What makes the COVID-19 virus even more dangerous than other viruses is people can go up to two weeks without showing any symptoms. Someone who thinks they are healthy can infect countless numbers of people during that time. Then, the people they infect can infect others without knowing it.

That's why the infection rate can easily and quickly spin out of control.

"Every one of us has someone who is worth staying home for," he said, citing his wife Kyra Sedgwick."The more folks involved, the merrier – We're all connected by various degrees (Trust me, I know!)," he wrote in the caption.

People have been posting who they're staying home under #IStayHomeFor on social media and tagging six connections asking them to do so as well.

Elton John is staying home for his husband and kids.



David Beckham is staying home for his wife, Victoria, and for their kids.



People are staying home so they don't infect the sick



People are staying home for family.



Some people are staying home for their pets.



She's staying home for all of humanity and beyond.


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