+
Kevin Bacon Beyoncé goats music

Kevin Bacon sang a Beyoncé song surrounded by goats because why not?

We are thrilled to announce that a new mathematical formula has been discovered that blows the lid off of everything we think we know and contains the potential to revolutionize life on planet Earth forever:

Kevin Bacon + guitar + Beyoncé + 3(goats) = untold joy(∞)

Who knew that Kevin Bacon playing guitar and singing a Beyoncé song surrounded by goats on a farm was key to unlocking the mysteries of the universe? Nobody, that's who.

And yet, here we are on this day in the year of our Lord 2022, witnessing the consummation of viral musical achievement over millennia in one minute and 16 seconds of pure Kevin Bey-conny delight.


Seriously, what did we do to deserve this gift?

Bacon shared the video, in which he casually strums his guitar and sings Beyoncé's "Heated" while being surrounded by goats on his farm, on Twitter. "Hot day, hot song. The goats and I are feeling Heated @Beyonce," he wrote. "Loving this track."

You just have to see it:

It's the delightfully unexpected acoustic cover none of us asked for but all of us needed.

Kevin Bacon and Beyoncé fans alike responded with joy over the video, with several people welcoming him to Beyoncé's collective fan base known as the Beyhive.

For those who haven't heard the original, here's the official lyric video of "Heated" from Beyoncé's newest album, "Renaissance," so you can see the inspiration for Bacon's cover.

Beyoncé - HEATED (Official Lyric Video)

And if less than a minute and a half of Kevin Bacon singing with farm animals wasn't enough for you, never fear. Here he is with his ukulele singing the Beatles' "When I'm 64" on his 64th birthday last month, with what appears to be a llama or alpaca in the background. Because, of course. What else would you do on your 64th birthday if you were Kevin Bacon?

(Side note: Please tell me I'm not the only Gen Xer having a hard time wrapping my mind around the fact that Kevin Bacon is 64. That seems impossible.)

Thanks to Kevin Bacon and Beyoncé and the goats for bringing us all together today for a desperately needed respite from the heaviness of the world. What a great way to start the week.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

Keep ReadingShow less

This article originally appeared on 02.04.19


As much as we'd like to pretend every phrase we utter is a lone star suspended in the space of our own genius, all language has a history. Unfortunately, given humanity's aptitude for treating each other like shit, etymology is fraught with reminders of our very racist world.

Since I have faith that most of you reading want to navigate the world with intelligence and empathy, I figured it'd be useful to share some of the everyday phrases rooted in racist etymology.

Knowledge is power, and the way we use and contextualize our words can make a huge difference in the atmospheres we create.


Keep ReadingShow less
via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


Keep ReadingShow less