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Dear reader,

I'm going to assume that you and I are both taxpayers. Presumably, we both care about the public good.


GIF from Golden Globes/NBC.

Roads, bridges, schools, emergency services, public transportation. For the things that will make our community run properly, we're hopefully both in agreement that shelling out a little from our pay is worth it.

Chipping in for the things we all need is part of the social contract in America.

GIF from " The Today Show."

But there's something we've been paying for that we shouldn't be.

And we do it every time because each time we even think about prioritizing something else instead of paying for this thing, we get threatened that our beloved sports teams will leave us. What is this thing, you ask, dear reader?

Stadiums.

Every time our teams want a new stadium, they act like:

GIF from "Parks and Recreation."

Would you call our relationship with teams that threaten to leave when they don't get their way a healthy one?

When we're cutting back on so many important services for lack of funding, it seems silly that we're willing to shell out up to a billion dollars for new stadiums.

We quite literally can't afford to foot the bill for our teams.

We're driving ourselves off a financial cliff. And meanwhile, they're making mad profits!

How do we keep getting rope-a-doped into such an unhealthy dynamic with our team stadiums?

John Oliver explains the drill and breaks down why the math doesn't work in our favor:

You and I spending another dime on this just doesn't make sense.

Share this for the other people who've had enough and need the facts.

Yours truly,

— A taxpaying sports fan who likes a nice stadium but also has a lot of other priorities and believes that there are way more important things to spend money on for her community and country

via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


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