It's odd that as concerned as we are about taxes, many don't blink an eye when it comes to stadiums.

Dear reader,

I'm going to assume that you and I are both taxpayers. Presumably, we both care about the public good.


GIF from Golden Globes/NBC.

Roads, bridges, schools, emergency services, public transportation. For the things that will make our community run properly, we're hopefully both in agreement that shelling out a little from our pay is worth it.

Chipping in for the things we all need is part of the social contract in America.

GIF from " The Today Show."

But there's something we've been paying for that we shouldn't be.

And we do it every time because each time we even think about prioritizing something else instead of paying for this thing, we get threatened that our beloved sports teams will leave us. What is this thing, you ask, dear reader?

Stadiums.

Every time our teams want a new stadium, they act like:

GIF from "Parks and Recreation."

Would you call our relationship with teams that threaten to leave when they don't get their way a healthy one?

When we're cutting back on so many important services for lack of funding, it seems silly that we're willing to shell out up to a billion dollars for new stadiums.

We quite literally can't afford to foot the bill for our teams.

We're driving ourselves off a financial cliff. And meanwhile, they're making mad profits!

How do we keep getting rope-a-doped into such an unhealthy dynamic with our team stadiums?

John Oliver explains the drill and breaks down why the math doesn't work in our favor:

You and I spending another dime on this just doesn't make sense.

Share this for the other people who've had enough and need the facts.

Yours truly,

— A taxpaying sports fan who likes a nice stadium but also has a lot of other priorities and believes that there are way more important things to spend money on for her community and country

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.