It's odd that as concerned as we are about taxes, many don't blink an eye when it comes to stadiums.

Dear reader,

I'm going to assume that you and I are both taxpayers. Presumably, we both care about the public good.


GIF from Golden Globes/NBC.

Roads, bridges, schools, emergency services, public transportation. For the things that will make our community run properly, we're hopefully both in agreement that shelling out a little from our pay is worth it.

Chipping in for the things we all need is part of the social contract in America.

GIF from " The Today Show."

But there's something we've been paying for that we shouldn't be.

And we do it every time because each time we even think about prioritizing something else instead of paying for this thing, we get threatened that our beloved sports teams will leave us. What is this thing, you ask, dear reader?

Stadiums.

Every time our teams want a new stadium, they act like:

GIF from "Parks and Recreation."

Would you call our relationship with teams that threaten to leave when they don't get their way a healthy one?

When we're cutting back on so many important services for lack of funding, it seems silly that we're willing to shell out up to a billion dollars for new stadiums.

We quite literally can't afford to foot the bill for our teams.

We're driving ourselves off a financial cliff. And meanwhile, they're making mad profits!

How do we keep getting rope-a-doped into such an unhealthy dynamic with our team stadiums?

John Oliver explains the drill and breaks down why the math doesn't work in our favor:

You and I spending another dime on this just doesn't make sense.

Share this for the other people who've had enough and need the facts.

Yours truly,

— A taxpaying sports fan who likes a nice stadium but also has a lot of other priorities and believes that there are way more important things to spend money on for her community and country

True

Davina Agudelo was born in Miami, Florida, but she grew up in Medellín, Colombia.

"I am so grateful for my upbringing in Colombia, surrounded by mountains and mango trees, and for my Colombian family," Agudelo says. "Colombia is the place where I learned what's truly essential in life." It's also where she found her passion for the arts.

While she was growing up, Colombia was going through a violent drug war, and Agudelo turned to literature, theater, singing, and creative writing as a refuge. "Journaling became a sacred practice, where I could leave on the page my dreams & longings as well as my joy and sadness," she says. "During those years, poetry came to me naturally. My grandfather was a poet and though I never met him, maybe there is a little bit of his love for poetry within me."

In 1998, when she left her home and everyone she loved and moved to California, the arts continued to be her solace and comfort. She got her bachelor's degree in theater arts before getting certified in journalism at UCLA. It was there she realized the need to create a media platform that highlighted the positive contributions of LatinX in the US.

"I know the power that storytelling and writing our own stories have and how creative writing can aid us in our own transformation."

In 2012, she started Alegría Magazine and it was a great success. Later, she refurbished a van into a mobile bookstore to celebrate Latin American and LatinX indie authors and poets, while also encouraging children's reading and writing in low-income communities across Southern California.

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2. Teens raise thousands for their senior trip, then donate it to their community instead.

When it came time for Islesboro Central School's Class of 2021 to pick the destination for their senior class trip, the students began eyeing a trip to Greece or maybe even South Korea. But in the end, they decided to donate $5,000 they'd raised for the trip to help out their community members struggling in the wake of the pandemic instead.

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