Italy has been hit harder by the coronavirus than most nations so far, and the entire country is currently under mandatory lockdown. All businesses except supermarkets and pharmacies are closed. No one is allowed to leave home except to make solo trips to get groceries or medicines.

What do you do when you have 60 million people quarantined inside their homes?

In Italy, you step out onto your balconies and sing with one another.


The past few days, the world has seen what resilience and solidarity looks like under dire circumstances as Italians in city after city share videos of neighbors making socially distanced music together. And people who are looking for bright lights in the midst of pandemic uncertainty—so basically, all of us—are loving this expression of the Italian spirit.

Sometimes it's one individual serenading the neighborhood:

But in many places, it's a community affair.

Check out people singing in Naples:

In Turin:

In Benevento:

In Siena:

In Sicily:

In Rome:

Even the Italian Air Force is using the power of music—and the power of Pavarotti's voice—to uplift the nation. Watch Air Force jets create an Italian flag out of thin air while the opera favorite belts out "Nessun Dorma." The single plane apparently represents the virus while the formation of planes overpowers it with the Italian flag. Chills.

Beautiful show of the human spirit, Italy. The world is with you.

True

Thank you to these #Tokyo2020 hopefuls who have shown that they are more than just good at their sport, but also good to their communities. Let's follow their lead.

Join P&G Good Everyday to do more good together.

LEGO recently unveiled plans to roll out a set of bricks for use by the visually impaired. Using each LEGO brick's 3-by-2 grid of raised dots, the educational toy includes bricks imprinted with every letter, number, and mathematical symbol in the braille alphabet.

Why LEGOs? Well, the American Printing House for the Blind recently found that only 8.4 percent of visually impaired children read Braille, as opposed to 50 percent in 1960. With the advent of audio books and voice-to-text technology, reading and writing are becoming lost arts for the visually impaired, often for lack of resources or time — modern braille education methods include expensive "Braille writers" or a slate and stylus, both of which create text that is difficult for students to edit or erase. LEGO bricks are not only swappable, but children are already familiar with their mechanics!

Keep Reading Show less
True

The United Nations is marking its 75th anniversary at a time of great challenge, including the worst global health crisis in its history. Will it bring the world closer together? Or will it lead to greater divides and mistrust?

Share your vision for shaping the future: take this 1-minute survey. Your responses to this survey will inform global priorities now and going forward.

Arnold Schwarzenegger is a badass in the movies, but he's increasingly building a reputation as a heroic "action star" in real life. Only, instead of dropping ungodly amounts of fake bullets into his enemies, Schwarzenegger has been dropping rhetorical bombs against his political opponents while building intellectual and emotional bridges to those who disagree with him but still have open hearts and minds.

The most recent example found Arnold responding to a comment someone made on Facebook. On the surface, that may sound like just about the least unique or original jumping off point for a story.




Keep Reading Show less

In a year where Major League Baseball has been delayed, the 2020 Olympics have been postponed, and the NBA season has been moved to something called a "bubble," a new sport has emerged as the ultimate athletic challenge in our COVID-19 world, at least for one British woman.

"Peak bagging" is an activity where hikers, mountaineers, and sometimes runners attempt to reach the summit of every mountaintop in a published list of peaks, and Sabrina Verjee, a British ultra runner, has just become the first woman to complete the 318 mile route through the 214 English peaks known as the "Wainwrights." Oh, and she did it with a bum knee.

The 39-year-old veterinary surgeon ascended over 35,000 meters on her run, completing the trek in just 6 days, 17 hours and 51 minutes, just eleven hours short of the record, which was broken last year. She completed the race on July 12th, after beginning it on the 6th, and plans to do it again in the near future. When she finished there were two previous Wainwright record holders, Joss Naylor and Steve Birkinshaw, waiting to congratulate her at the finish line.


Keep Reading Show less