The oddly cathartic 'Keep Going Song' will make you alternate between laughing and crying

2020 has definitely, for sure, without a doubt, been the strangest year we as a society have collectively lived through. And it's not even close. Remember when we all thought 2016 was a doozy? How adorable were we then?

We've all worked on ways to cope through the upheaval of a global pandemic, the intensity of social unrest, the chaos of political insanity, and the uncertainty of what comes next. Some of us are dealing with the loss of loved ones, unemployment and financial stress, helping our kids navigate virtual schooling, and the mental health toll all of this is taking.

Considering all of that, most of us can use all the help we can get in the coping department.

Perhaps that's why the "Keep Going Song" from The Bengsons—a husband-wife musical duo—is resonating with so many people. The song, which they says is "meant as a gesture of love, a try, a fail, a blessing, way to be gentle," is quirky, funny, alternatingly silly and profound, and overall just thoroughly delightful. In between the catchy "Keep going on song" choruses, Abigail Bengson speaks and sings a seemingly spontaneous narrative while Shaun Bengson plays a simple guitar riff in the background, and it all works in a weird and wonderful way.


In the beginning it seems like it's just going to be a goofy song as Abigail describes how they ended up living with Shaun's parents' house with their 3-year-old, but when she suddenly shifts into describing the universal truths of what we're all going through, there comes this unexpected emotional unveiling effect. Maybe it's the compassion in the lyrics or the sincerity in her unique voice. Maybe it's when she asks, "Are you okay? Are you alright? Are you okay? Are you alright?" or when she sings, "I hope you have enough good company or enough good memory to last you a long time," but it's hard not to feel understood and comforted by her.

The Keep Going Song (title track) www.youtube.com


By the time you get to the end, you feel almost like you've just had a heartwarming call with an old friend. And it's clear from the more than 2200 comments on Facebook that people found something in the song that hit a soft spot in people around the world.

"Thank you so much. I sent this to all my expat friends here in France and we all felt cared for. You are the proof that there are beautiful beautiful people all over the world...love," wrote one commenter.

Another wrote, "This is beautiful and raw and true and inspiring and so so healing and currently rippling around my little universe of Irish family and friends who are rippling it even further. Word."

Others added their gratitude as well:

"Somehow you seem to know my heart in both its joy and its sorrow. Thank you for sharing your prayers of hope and positivity. I will carry them with me tomorrow as I mourn my sister on her birthday."

"Thank you so much for this song. It's the first work of art that has come out from this time that resonates so deeply. Can't help but cry every time I play it (and it's been a whole lot). And sharing. We need this blessing so much. May it bring many good things to you."

"I'll just echo what everyone else is saying here - this is what I hadn't realized I needed since "the shit hit." I felt like I was being hugged by an old friend the entire time I listened. Thank you. All the love to you and your family."

"You have moved me and all the friends and family with whom I've shared this to tears. You went straight to the heart of this moment, fully inhabited all the feelings, and beautifully reached out to hold and be held by us all. This is a powerful gift that we didn't quite appreciate how much we needed until we received it. May you feel a little less alone, too. Thank you for making this Monday morning feel more possible to face now."

Some commenters asked if the couple had a Venmo or Cashapp or something where they could donate a little to say thank you, and The Bensons responded with this:

"Oh this is so kind! Thank you so much! We have the album for sale on iTunes and Apple Music and the money from that would wind its way to us. Or you could send those dollars to your favorite initiative! Here's one doing amazing (non-partisan) work for helping disenfranchised voters, Reclaim Our Vote: bit.ly/rov2020donate"

So yeah, they're as good a people as they seem in their video.

Thank you, Bengsons, for sharing your joy and rage and grief with us in a way that we all feel heard and understood.

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A lot of people here are like family to me," Michelle says about Bread for the City — a community nonprofit located in Washington DC that provides local residents with food, clothing, health care, social advocacy, and legal services. And since the pandemic began, the need to support organizations like Bread for the City is greater than ever, which is why Amazon is Delivering Smiles to local charities across the country this holiday season.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.

Sometimes it seems like social media is too full of trolls and misinformation to justify its continued existence, but then something comes along that makes it all worth it.

Apparently, a song many of us have never heard of shot to the top of the charts in Italy in 1972 for the most intriguing reason. The song, written and performed by Adriano Celentano and is called "Prisencolinensinainciusol" which means...well, nothing. It's gibberish. In fact, the entire song is nonsense lyrics made to sound like English, and oddly, it does.

Occasionally, you can hear what sounds like a real word or phrase here and there—"eyes" and "color balls died" and "alright" a few times, for example—but it mostly just sounds like English without actually being English. It's like an auditory illusion and it does some super trippy things to your brain to listen to it.

Plus the video someone shared to go with it is fantastic. It's gone crazy viral because how could it not.

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True

A lot of people here are like family to me," Michelle says about Bread for the City — a community nonprofit located in Washington DC that provides local residents with food, clothing, health care, social advocacy, and legal services. And since the pandemic began, the need to support organizations like Bread for the City is greater than ever, which is why Amazon is Delivering Smiles to local charities across the country this holiday season.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.
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