Family

Internet strangers are helping each other manage chronic illnesses. It's wonderful.

The web can't cure chronic illness, but it can help make it seem less daunting.

Internet strangers are helping each other manage chronic illnesses. It's wonderful.
True
Seventh Generation

Being diagnosed with a chronic health problem can be terrifying and isolating — even more so if it means changing your diet, your lifestyle, and the products you bring into your home.

I know because it happened to me.

It was 2000, and I was 21 years old, broke, and sick when a new doctor diagnosed me with celiac disease. After a few visits, he told me I had celiac disease with lactose intolerance. If I wanted to start feeling better, I needed to cut out almost all grains and dairy products.


Just some of the enemies of my fragile digestive system.

Suddenly my entire world was different.

I couldn't eat any of my staple student foods anymore: Farewell, ramen. Adios granola. And I quickly learned that gluten was in almost everything — even products it has no reason to be in, like chewing gum. I was clueless and freaked out.

Thankfully, I had the internet — and so did dozens of other celiac sufferers. We congregated on forums, sharing stories, "safe" food recommendations, and strategies for eating in restaurants. My internet forum friends were my lifeboat, and I held on with both hands to the knowledge they shared.

Taking back control from a chronic illness requires compassion, understanding, and a lot of learning.

For people with chronic health conditions, the web can be an amazing resource to do that.

"Dear Internet: Today I learned licorice is made from wheat flour? Beware and learn from my sadness." — Me in 2002. Image by iStock.

Organizations like Beyond Celiac and The Celiac Foundation have hugely informative websites and vibrant online communities dedicated to helping people get a handle on their disease and access tools and information so they can recover and thrive.

Their online resources include food databases, grocery store apps, restaurant listings, message boards, information about political activism, even a gluten-free dating website. There are active blogger networks too, sharing personal stories, recipes, and motivation.

Resources for people with chronic illness — particularly those triggered by external factors — exist largely because there's nowhere else to turn.

A beautiful gluten-free restaurant meal — perfect for Instagram. Image by iStock.

For people with celiac disease, psoriasis, migraines, and asthma, knowing whether a product is safe to use or consume can be the difference between a normal day and a serious flare-up that might leave them bedridden or worse.

It's really only in the last five years that companies and government regulators started taking the requests of the growing ingredient transparency movement seriously. That spurred a huge increase in the number of products with detailed ingredients lists and more companies realizing that giving consumers access to information can help sales. Particularly for people with asthma, it is much simpler to avoid a common symptom trigger and find truly fragrance-free cleaning and personal care products. For others, change hasn't happened as quickly.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration agreed to move forward on implementing rules for a gluten-free designation in 2004.

It didn't issue its final guidelines until 2013.

The new regulations allow companies producing gluten-free food products that contain less than 20 parts per million of gluten (a barely negligible amount, and generally not enough to cause a reaction) to label them as "gluten-free." While the FDA assures consumers it will be regularly testing products once they've arrived on store shelves, companies aren't required to submit proof they've tested their products for gluten before they go to market. The regulations also don't apply to food service establishments, personal care products, or medication. Those issues notwithstanding, it is a remarkable step toward complete ingredient disclosure.

Managed properly, people with celiac disease, psoriasis, asthma, and other chronic illnesses can live happy, wonderful lives. But it takes work, diligence, compassion, and support.

Pictured: four people who just learned their mobile phones are celiac-friendly. No, not really. Image by iStock.

Since my celiac diagnosis in 2000, gluten-free food and other products have become a billion-dollar industry. I have good days and bad ones, and sometimes even my best food plans go awry and knock me out of commission for a while. That's the nature of a lifelong illness, and I've come to terms with it. A lot of that acceptance comes from knowing I'm not alone in this.

In the absence of full, government-regulated ingredients lists on every product I eat, wear, or use — there are big-hearted, experience-sharing online communities ready to step in and help me navigate life with a chronic illness.

True

In 1945, the world had just endured the bloodiest war in history. World leaders were determined to not repeat the mistakes of the past. They wanted to build a better future, one free from the "scourge of war" so they signed the UN Charter — creating a global organization of nations that could deter and repel aggressors, mediate conflicts and broker armistices, and ensure collective progress.

Over the following 75 years, the UN played an essential role in preventing, mitigating or resolving conflicts all over the world. It faced new challenges and new threats — including the spread of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, a Cold War and brutal civil wars, transnational terrorism and genocides. Today, the UN faces new tensions: shifting and more hostile geopolitics, digital weaponization, a global pandemic, and more.

This slideshow shows how the UN has worked to build peace and security around the world:

1 / 12

Malians wait in line at a free clinic run by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Mission in Mali in 2014. Over their 75 year history, UN peacekeepers have deployed around the world in military and nonmilitary roles as they work towards human security and peace. Here's a look back at their history.

Photo credit: UN Photo/Marco Dormino

via Tom Ward / Instagram

Artist Tom Ward has used his incredible illustration techniques to give us some new perspective on modern life through popular Disney characters. "Disney characters are so iconic that I thought transporting them to our modern world could help us see it through new eyes," he told The Metro.

Tom says he wanted to bring to life "the times we live in and communicate topical issues in a relatable way."

In Ward's "Alt Disney" series, Prince Charming and Pinocchio have fallen victim to smart phone addiction. Ariel is living in a polluted ocean, and Simba and Baloo have been abused by humans.

Keep Reading Show less
True
Back Market

Between the new normal that is working from home and e-learning for students of all ages, having functional electronic devices is extremely important. But that doesn't mean needing to run out and buy the latest and greatest model. In fact, this cycle of constantly upgrading our devices to keep up with the newest technology is an incredibly dangerous habit.

The amount of e-waste we produce each year is growing at an increasing rate, and the improper treatment and disposal of this waste is harmful to both human health and the planet.

So what's the solution? While no one expects you to stop purchasing new phones, laptops, and other devices, what you can do is consider where you're purchasing them from and how often in order to help improve the planet for future generations.

Keep Reading Show less

With many schools going virtual, many daycare facilities being closed or limited, and millions of parents working from home during the pandemic, the balance working moms have always struggled to achieve has become even more challenging in 2020. Though there are more women in the workforce than ever, women still take on the lion's share of household and childcare duties. Moms also tend to bear the mental load of keeping track of all the little details that keep family life running smoothly, from noticing when kids are outgrowing their clothing to keeping track of doctor and dentist appointments to organizing kids' extracurricular activities.

It's a lot. And it's a lot more now that we're also dealing with the daily existential dread of a global pandemic, social unrest, political upheaval, and increasingly intense natural disasters.

That's why scientist Gretchen Goldman's refreshingly honest photo showing where and how she conducted a CNN interview is resonating with so many.

Keep Reading Show less

Schools often have to walk a fine line when it comes to parental complaints. Diverse backgrounds, beliefs, and preferences for what kids see and hear will always mean that schools can't please everyone all the time, so educators have to discern what's best for the whole, broad spectrum of kids in their care.

Sometimes, what's best is hard to discern. Sometimes it's absolutely not.

Such was the case this week when a parent at a St. Louis elementary school complained in a Facebook group about a book that was read to her 7-year-old. The parent wrote:

"Anyone else check out the read a loud book on Canvas for 2nd grade today? Ron's Big Mission was the book that was read out loud to my 7 year old. I caught this after she watched it bc I was working with my 3rd grader. I have called my daughters school. Parents, we have to preview what we are letting the kids see on there."

Keep Reading Show less