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'I'm 45 years old and I have never once casually, comfortably, held hands with a partner in public.'

"I'm 45 years old and I have never once casually, comfortably, carelessly held hands with a partner in public."

Do you think much about the simple, seemingly small things you do in public?

Most of us probably don't give too much thought to holding hands. It's small, right? But for some people, everyday gestures are anything but small. As Panti explains, for many gay people, holding hands is a big deal.


Instead of simply walking down the street, doing your thing, being happy, you're looking around, seeing who's there, trying to decide if it's even worth holding hands. And if you think, "Yeah, we're doing this," then you have to wonder if someone will hurt you for it.

Those small gestures, though, are what make us human.

And when you can't do the small human things without a great deal of thought, it takes a toll.

On a large scale, Panti says that homophobia drives people to mistreat LGBTQ people.

What is homophobia, anyway?

"So, gay people are going to destroy the institution of marriage. Gay couples will be wandering through orphanages picking babies off shelves, trying to find one that matches their new IKEA sofa. Or that allowing gay people to get married will destroy society itself.

... Now, of course, the other real driver of homophobia — and you can all clutch your pearls here because I'm going to go here — is a disgust with gay sex. In particular with gay male sex... They feverishly imagine that we spent all day jumping around buggering each other ... and, in fact, what they actually do is reduce us down to this one sex act whether or not we do it at all. Because we are not regular people with the same hopes and aspirations and ambitions and feelings as everyone else. We are simply walking sex acts."

It's time we stop tolerating it.

People are people. We are all people. And we all deserve to be treated the same.

Watch Panti's full talk because it's truly inspiring.

Are you a fan of equality? You can share this incredible talk. Maybe someone who needs to see it will.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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This story originally appeared on 04.01.19


Australia is sending a strong message to domestic abusers worldwide: You're not welcome here.

Australia has recently broadened a migration law to bar any person who has been convicted of domestic violence anywhere in the world from getting a visa to enter the country. American R&B singer Chris Brown and boxing star Floyd Mayweather had been banned from the country in the past, following their domestic violence convictions. Now the ban applies to all foreign visitors or residents who have been found guilty of violence against women or children.

Even convicted domestic abusers who already have visas and are living in Australia can be kicked out under the new rule. The government is using the rule, which took effect on February 28, 2019 to send a message to domestic violence perpetrators.

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Family

A mom describes her tween son's brain. It's a must-read for all parents.

"Sometimes I just feel really angry and I don’t know why."

This story originally appeared on 1.05.19


It started with a simple, sincere question from a mother of an 11-year-old boy.

An anonymous mother posted a question to Quora, a website where people can ask questions and other people can answer them. This mother wrote:

How do I tell my wonderful 11 year old son, (in a way that won't tear him down), that the way he has started talking to me (disrespectfully) makes me not want to be around him (I've already told him the bad attitude is unacceptable)?

It's a familiar scenario for those of us who have raised kids into the teen years. Our sweet, snuggly little kids turn into moody middle schoolers seemingly overnight, and sometimes we're left reeling trying to figure out how to handle their sensitive-yet-insensitive selves.


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