+
upworthy
Pop Culture

How many 'chuggas' before 'choo choo'? A mom accidentally starts a fierce online debate.

Her rules were simple: Explain why. Any logic counts. Make it weird. People did not disappoint.

chugga chugga choo choo, facebook

It's definitely not just one "chugga." We know that that.

The internet is a place where we can exchange information, ideas and countless points of view, thus making for in-depth conversations. It is also a cesspool where pointless keyboard wars are waged in the comments section of even the most well-intentioned post. Perhaps it is because humanity is still at the toddler stage when it comes to learning online etiquette, or perhaps it’ll be that way forever. Time will tell.

Regardless, the way people can so quickly get into heated debates on even the most mundane subject can sometimes lead to pure comedy. We’re talking farmers going all out to hype up their “chicken armies” against other farmers, hilarious workplace spats going off the deep end, people questioning reality over a blue and black (or is it a gold and white?) dress. That sort of thing.

Recently, a mom in Vermont accidentally unleashed a discourse of this fervent nature when she asked via Facebook the very important, very controversial question:

“How many chuggas come before choo choo?”

Indeed, this is the question of our time.


Her rules were simple: “Explain why. Any logic counts. Make it weird.” People did not disappoint.

Some brought the history of the imaginary train tracks into consideration, saying that newer tracks could have only two, but the “sky’s the limit” with older ones, “if you're even lucky enough to get to the choo choo.”

Others brought physics into the equation. “Only 2, unless the train can’t quite hit the climax of the hill, then 3. ” One person commented. Another added, “Depends on whether the train is going up a hill and the grade of the hill. If it's steep the chuggas are going to start slow and there will be more. On the flat, I'd say 6.”

And then some took a more philosophical approach, surmising that more “chuggas” would amount to more motivation for the kids. “Eight: I - think - I - can (or I - know - I - can) twice, and then the ‘choo choo,’ which is the kid/train version of an inspirational grunt of effort on the way up and “hell yeah” when the goal is achieved. This can be extended to more if you’re having a particularly strenuous journey 😊,” one person explained.

Though no one reached full agreement, most answers fell between two and eight “chuggas,” with an even amount being more common than an odd amount.

The debate over “how many chuggas” was an internet craze not too long before, thanks to the question being posed to Reddit back in 2019. It even broke through to Twitter, arguably the online platform most notorious for fighting over semantics. Again, no one could agree.

However, we might find the answer to this question in pop culture. For instance, “Chugga-Chugga Choo Choo,” a children’s book written in 1999 by Kevin Lewis, clearly uses only two “chuggas.” And in the song "Chugga Chugga Choo Choo Train," sung by Sheriff Callie from the episode "Train Bandits" in Sheriff Callie's Wild West, again only two “chuggas” are used.


But then again, this song, “Chugga Chugga Choo Choo” by Choo Choo Soul in 2006 (below) has only two “chuggas” in the title but then a whopping TWELVE “chuggas” in the lyrics. So who knows.

We might never be able to agree on this topic—unless you all admit it should be six “chuggas”—but at least we can all take a moment to laugh at how wonderfully ridiculous the internet can be.

Pop Culture

Optical illusion that looks like a person with two dogs has people totally tripping

It takes a while to see it, but there are not two dogs in the photo.

Where is the third dog in this photo?

Optical illusions are wild. The way our brains perceive what our eyes see can be way off base, even when we're sure about what we're seeing.

Plenty of famous optical illusions have been created purposefully, from the Ames window that appears to be moving back and forth when it's actually rotating 360 degrees to the spiral image that makes Van Gogh's "Starry Night" look like it's moving.

But sometimes optical illusions happen by accident. Those ones are even more fun because we know they aren't a result of someone trying to trick our brains. Our brains do the tricking all by themselves.

Keep ReadingShow less
Pop Culture

Compilation of Mr. Rogers' lesser-known shining moments is a masterclass in human kindness

Take 10 minutes to let Fred Rogers' wholesome goodness wash over you (but maybe grab a tissue first).

Fred Rogers was an example for us all.

History has many heroes, but few human beings have left a direct mark on children's lives like Fred Rogers did. In a time when television had become a staple in American households, prompting fears over its potentially pernicious influence, Mister Rogers' Neighborhood shone like a beacon of wholesome delight.

Fred Rogers' conviction that educational television could make a positive difference in the lives of children has been proven true again and again. Countless people have shared how Mr. Rogers' messages of love and compassion and self-worth influenced them during their formative years, and for many, his presence provided a calm and stability that were missing in their own households.

The emotional and societal topics Mr. Rogers tackled are vast and varied, and it seems there are always more gems of goodness to uncover in the archives. Eric Stanley of "Stay Inspired" shared a compilation of clips from Fred Rogers' life that exemplify his warm, genuine kindness, some of which are unfamiliar even to ardent fans of the show.

Keep ReadingShow less
@susandoingsusanthings/TikTok

Though this image might infuriate you, know there's more to the story.

We’ve probably all (especially moms and wives) have had it up to here with stories of men not being able to really pull their weight in partnerships.

So when I present to you a story about a husband leaving behind a sink full of dirty dishes for his wife to find, you’d probably sooner roll your eyes and contemplate hopping over to Instagram instead than give this one a read.

But hold on just a second, because this story has a surprising hopeful twist.

Keep ReadingShow less
Canva

Mom makes teen son's bed and picks up his clothes after he goes to school.

Parenting is difficult, not only because raising unique human beings through childhood and beyond is complex on every level, but because it's hard to know if you're doing it right. And the internet definitely doesn't help on that front, as everyone has an opinion on what constitutes good parenting.

Case in point: A mom who makes her teen son's bed and picks up his clothes for him after she drops him off at school every morning.

Shannon Tarkey a mother of five (including triplets), shared a video on Instagram and Facebook showing how she makes her son's bed and picks up his clothes, and people had feelings about it. The text overlay on the video as she's tidying up reads:

Keep ReadingShow less

The bride wouldn't budge.

One of the major decisions a couple has when planning a wedding is whether guests are free to bring their children or if it will be child-free. Many people believe that children should be able to come to weddings because, after all, they are family affairs.

However, the counter-argument is that a wedding also costs a lot of money per guest, and people would rather have an adult enjoying a $75 plate of prime rib than a 5-year-old who will take a bite and then ask for some chicken nuggets.

Further, the child-free crowd may also want their party to be an all-out rave, which may be inappropriate for children to attend.

Keep ReadingShow less

Dad has adorable imaginary hair beef with daughter's teacher

Dads are fully capable of all the things a mom can do and one dad is on a mission to assert his abilities in an imaginary beef he has with his daughter's preschool teacher. Jonathan Gregg posted a video explaining that he's been working really hard to be able to style his daughter's hair in ways that she likes.

In the caption he writes, "Sure, when I first started doing my daughter's hair, it was like a blind gorilla trying to style a coconut." But he goes on to say he's good at doing hard things, so when he sent his child to school with a "high pony waterfall," he was surprised when she came back with an asymmetrical French braid. Upon asking his daughter where the new hair style came from, she replied, "Ms. Yolanda."

That was all Gregg needed to know, "Ms. Yolanda, I didn't know you wanted problems okay. Don't start none won't be none but now we're here. So now, I gotta spend all weekend learning the fishtail, made popular by Elsa Queen of Arendelle because Ms. Yolanda apparently chose violence."

Keep ReadingShow less