He's a Syrian immigrant. He sells bananas. And you'll love him.

The kids call him Banana Man.

Image by Upworthy/YouTube.


Everyone else? They call him Abdulhamed Kharma. He works as a fruit vendor in New York City.


Image by Upworthy/YouTube.

He doesn't just sell bananas. He sells melons, apples, oranges, strawberries ... pretty much all your standard fruits.


Image by Upworthy/YouTube.

He has many loyal customers. One even brought him a scarf and a pair of gloves to keep his hands warm in the winter.

Image by Upworthy/YouTube.

And he's got big dreams.

GIF by Upworthy/YouTube.

He's an integral part of the community where he lives and works.

Tribeca, NYC. Photo by Aude/Wikimedia Commons.

People need fruit, he sells them fruit. Without him, Tribeca, the neighborhood where he sets up shop, would undoubtedly be an avocado-less wasteland.

Like millions of his fellow New Yorkers, he's an immigrant.

Photo by John Moore/Getty Images.

When Kharma was 14, his family left their native Syria — traveling first to Turkey, then to Egypt, and finally to the U.S.

Image by Upworthy/YouTube.

Like many immigrants, Kharma is grateful to the United States for giving him the chance to pursue his goals, which he believes would have been impossible back in Syria.

Despite all evidence to the contrary, Donald Trump and others are intent on portraying people like Kharma and his fellow Syrian immigrants, well ... like this stock photo:

Man, there are stock photos of literally everything. Photo via iStock.

When in fact, this is usually a much more accurate depiction:

Syrian refugees in Greece. Photo by Daniel Mihailescu/Getty Images.

Kharma's family was lucky to make their way to the United States long before Syria's current devastating Civil War. Since the conflict began, over 4 million people have fled the country. Most have landed in Turkey and elsewhere in the Middle East, and many others have made the dangerous crossing into Europe.

The United States has only committed to admitting 10,000. And even so, an intense debate rages over their status, with over half of all governors vowing to prevent refugees from settling in their states.

Kharma says that since 2011, when he tells customers that he's from Syria, some turn away. Others don't know what to say.

Image by Upworthy/YouTube.

But his example demonstrates that, by and large, immigrants and refugees want basically the same things the rest of us want.

Actor and UN Goodwill Ambassador Ashley Judd visits a refugee camp in Jordan. Photo by Khalil Mazraawi/Getty Images.

Like most of us, they want safe homes for their families.

Like most of us, they want education for their children.

Like most of us, they just want to sell bananas.

(Well, like some of us, at any rate).

Despite the prejudice he sometimes encounters, what keeps Kharma going is his belief in the concept reflected by his last name.

It's all about karma, he says.

GIF by Upworthy/YouTube.

Put yourself in Kharma's shoes. You'll probably find they're not that different from yours.

Watch Upworthy's conversation with Kharma below.

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Davina Agudelo was born in Miami, Florida, but she grew up in Medellín, Colombia.

"I am so grateful for my upbringing in Colombia, surrounded by mountains and mango trees, and for my Colombian family," Agudelo says. "Colombia is the place where I learned what's truly essential in life." It's also where she found her passion for the arts.

While she was growing up, Colombia was going through a violent drug war, and Agudelo turned to literature, theater, singing, and creative writing as a refuge. "Journaling became a sacred practice, where I could leave on the page my dreams & longings as well as my joy and sadness," she says. "During those years, poetry came to me naturally. My grandfather was a poet and though I never met him, maybe there is a little bit of his love for poetry within me."

In 1998, when she left her home and everyone she loved and moved to California, the arts continued to be her solace and comfort. She got her bachelor's degree in theater arts before getting certified in journalism at UCLA. It was there she realized the need to create a media platform that highlighted the positive contributions of LatinX in the US.

"I know the power that storytelling and writing our own stories have and how creative writing can aid us in our own transformation."

In 2012, she started Alegría Magazine and it was a great success. Later, she refurbished a van into a mobile bookstore to celebrate Latin American and LatinX indie authors and poets, while also encouraging children's reading and writing in low-income communities across Southern California.

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via Pixabay

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Census Bureau figures say that almost a quarter of men and nearly 46% of women over the age of 75 live alone.

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