+
halloween decor, decorations, skeleton house

The Dinotes' hilarious skeletons.

The Dinote family of San Antonio, Texas, inadvertently started a tradition in 2020 when they purchased two human skeletons and a skeleton dog to decorate their lawn for Halloween. Steven Dinote told KSAT they jokingly propped one up against a lawnmower, which gave his wife, Danielle, the idea of making the skeleton walk the dog the next day.

This led to a competition where the family members try to outdo one another with funny ideas.

"It started as a joke in October 2020 when everyone was home during the pandemic," Steven told Today. The displays became must-sees for the people in the neighborhood who would stroll by their house to see what the skeletons were up to each day.

“We didn’t realize how popular it got … we had neighbors all of a sudden walk on up and say ‘We love your display, we purposely change our walks just to see what you got,’” Dinote said. Since 2020, the skeleton display has expanded to four adults, a kid, a dog, a cat and a piranha-like fish.


via Oscar Carrero

The family says it takes between 20 minutes to an hour to set up the scenes daily. They put everything together in the morning, but sometimes have to do a bit of preparation the night before.

The family has even set up a Facebook page, Skeleton House of San Antonio, where people around the world can keep up with the family’s antics. Last year’s scenes included couples’ yoga, a rock band and painter Bob Ross giving a painting lesson.

This year started with a scene of the skeleton family returning from vacation to celebrate the holiday. “Boo!! We’re back!!!” a sign on the lawn read. What a great way to kick off the season.

via Oscar Carrero

This scene of the skeletons golfing was so detailed that the Dinotes' neighbor, Oscar Carrero, could only do it justice by taking a video. The golf balls in the scene go all the way to the neighbor's lawn where another skeleton is holding the pin.

Here's a scene from "It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown." They did a perfect job of recreating the ghost costumes worn by the "Peanuts" kids.

via Oscar Carrero

A Texas-style BBQ! "Bone appetit, y'all!"

via Oscar Carrero

A lucha libre match. This scene could also work to celebrate Dia de Los Muertos.

via Oscar Carrero

The boney break dancers. I wonder if they're listening to Bone Thugs-N-Harmony? "See you at the crossroads, crossroads, crossroads ..."

via Oscar Carrero

In the end, for the Dinotes, it’s all about spreading some cheer during times that have been challenging for a lot of people.

“We’re getting a lot of people coming up and thanking us and bringing a little joy. We had one person say there’s so much negative stuff going on in the news, everyone’s bitter with each other and it makes their day just to come over and see a little bit of humor,” he said. “If that helps, that makes us happy.”

All photos courtesy of Biofinity Energys®

True

The human eye reveals so much about who we are. One look can convey love, annoyance, exhaustion, or wisdom.

Our eyes tell the world if we are getting enough sleep, if we’ve been crying, or whether we are truly happy (or just faking it). When looking at the face, the eyes dominate emotional communication—after all, they’ve long been known as the “window to the soul.”

Keep ReadingShow less

Robin Williams—the comedic genius

We all know the late, great Robin Williams was a comic genius. Many people also know that he was classically trained in theater. In a recently unearthed clip from 1991, Williams combines those two talents, leaving people splitting at the seams even decades later.

Williams was a guest on “The Tonight Show” starring Johnny Carson, when he and Carson began chatting about William Shakespeare, who Williams quickly quipped was a “man with a second grade education, [who] wrote some of the greatest poetry of all time, and sometimes I think, maybe not.”

Carson then asked Williams how he felt about other actors playing Hamlet (for context, Mel Gibson had recently starred in the role). Williams, being no stranger to the Bard’s work, then went into one of his delightfully creative frenzies, managing to effortlessly slide into the voices of Sylvester Stallone, Arnold Schwarzenegger and Jack Nicholson while throwing out verses like it was nothing.

Keep ReadingShow less
Sponsored

This is the most important van in NYC… and it’s full of socks.

How can socks make such a huge difference? You'd be surprised.

all photos provided by Coalition for The Homeless

Every night, the van delivers nourishment in all kinds of ways to those who need it most

True

Homelessness in New York City has reached its highest levels since the Great Depression of the 1930s. Over 50,000 people sleep each night in a shelter, while thousands of others rely on city streets, the subway system and other public locations as spaces to rest.

That’s why this meal (and sock) delivery van is an effective resource for providing aid to those experiencing homelessness in New York City.

Every night of the year, from 7pm to 9:30, the Coalition for the Homeless drives a small fleet of vans to over 25 stops throughout upper and lower Manhattan and in the Bronx. At each stop, adults and families in need can receive a warm meal, a welcoming smile from volunteers, and a fresh, comfy new pair of Bombas socks. Socks may be even more important than you think.

Bombas was founded in 2013 after the discovery that socks were the #1 most requested clothing item at homeless shelters.

Access to fresh, clean socks is often limited for individuals experiencing homelessness—whether someone is living on the street and walking for much of the day, or is unstably housed without reliable access to laundry or storage. And for individuals experiencing or at risk of homelessness —expenses might need to be prioritized for more critical needs like food, medication, school supplies, or gas. Used socks can’t be donated to shelters for hygienic reasons, making this important item even more difficult to supply to those who need it the most.

Bombas offers its consumers durable, long-lasting and comfortable socks, and for every pair of Bombas socks purchased, an additional pair of specially-designed socks is donated to organizations supporting those in need, like Coalition for the Homeless. What started out as a simple collaboration with a few organizations and nonprofits to help individuals without housing security has quickly become a bona fide giving movement. Bombas now has approximately 3,500 Giving Partners nationwide.

Though every individual’s experience is unique, there can frequently be an inherent lack of trust of institutions that want to help—making a solution even more challenging to achieve. “I’ve had people reach out when I’m handing them a pair of socks and their hands are shaking and they’re looking around, and they’re wondering ‘why is this person being nice to me?’” Robbi Montoya—director at Dorothy Day House, another Giving Partner—told Bombas.

Donations like socks are a small way to create connection. And they can quickly become something much bigger. Right now over 1,000 people receive clothing and warm food every night, rain or shine, from a Coalition for the Homeless van. That bit of consistent kindness during a time of struggle can help offer the feeling of true support. This type of encouragement is often crucial for organizations to help those take the next difficult steps towards stability.

This philosophy helped Bombas and its abundance of Giving Partners extend their reach beyond New York City. Over 75 million clothing items have been donated to those who need it the most across all 50 states. Over the years Bombas has accumulated all kinds of valuable statistics, information, and highlights from Giving Partners similar to the Coalition for the Homeless vans and Dorothy Day House, which can be found in the Bombas Impact Report.

In the Impact Report, you’ll also find out how to get involved—whether it’s purchasing a pair of Bombas socks to get another item donated, joining a volunteer group, or shifting the conversation around homelessness to prioritize compassion and humanity.

To find out more, visit BeeBetter.com.

via Pixabay

A good ol' fashioned strip bandage.

It's annoying to get a cut on your knuckles, because they're a hard place to put a Band-Aid. If you put it on too tight, you can’t move your finger and if you put it on too loose, it easily slips off. Of course, you can buy Band-Aids made to go over knuckles, but unless you have a MacGyver-level first-aid kit, you probably only have basic strips.

A new video shared by everyone's "mom hack bestie" Autumn Grace, aka HonestlyAutumnb, on Instagram shows an easy way to transform a run-of-the-mill strip Band-Aid into a fully-functional knuckle bandage. “This is one of the best band aid life hacks!” she captioned the video.

To transform a strip bandage into a knuckle Band-Aid, you must make two cuts with scissors, and voila! "The hack I never thought I needed to know until today!" VermillionChicago commented on the post.

Keep ReadingShow less

Author, educator and mother Esther Wojcicki.

Esther Wojcicki has earned the right to tell people how to raise their kids. She’s an educator, journalist and bestselling author of "How to Raise Successful People" who has raised three daughters—two are CEOs and the other a doctor.

Susan Wojcicki is the CEO of YouTube, Anne Wojcicki is the co-founder and CEO of 23andMe and Dr. Janet Wojcicki is an anthropologist and epidemiologist who works on HIV progression and obesity risk in children.

In "How to Raise Successful People" Esther Wojcicki says the secret to success is the result of “TRICK”: trust, respect, independence, collaboration and kindness. In a new article she wrote for NBC Chicago, she boiled that down to one rule, “Don't do anything for your kids that they can do for themselves.”

Keep ReadingShow less