Half of Americans don't recycle their beauty products. Here's how you can change that.
True
Garnier Beauty Responsibly

Growing up, actress and singer Mandy Moore recycled everything she knew how to, which wasn't that much.

She separated glass, plastic, and cans from the regular trash — which was actually pretty revolutionary in the 1980s, even though it's more commonplace today. Since recycling was only just becoming a regular practice, that was the extent of her know-how.

"I didn't grow up with the education that kids today have, in terms of their global footprint," Moore explains.


All photos via Garnier.

While that may be the case, her eco-friendly practices in the 1980s actually outshine the majority of Americans' recycling practices today.

According to the EPA's most recent report on national recycling rates, only 34.6% of garbage is recycled in this country. What's more, beauty and personal care products make up approximately one-third of the trash in landfills.

Considering how many beauty products come in recyclable bottles and packaging now, there's so much recycling that could be taking place but simply isn't.

So Moore stepped up as Garnier's spokesperson and got behind an endeavor to remind people they can do better by their beauty products.

The campaign is called Rinse, Recycle, Repeat, and it's a recycling program that essentially teaches people how to recycle beauty products.

According to Moore, when it comes to beauty products, a lot of people don't know what can and can't be recycled, so they either throw it all in the trash or try to recycle things that can't be collected along with recyclables like glass jars, cans, and paper.

So Garnier teamed up with TerraCycle and DoSomething.org to help take the guesswork out of bathroom recycling by encouraging people to collect their beauty product empties and send them to Garnier for free recycling.

All you have to do is start collecting empty bottles. Once you've accumulated 10 pounds, mail them to TerraCycle.

This attempt to shift consumer behavior has worked beautifully so far. Since 2011, Garnier has successfully kept over 10 million empties out of landfills.

In addition to shifting behavior, it's also about reminding the next generation that even little acts like this can go along way.

That's one of the main reasons Moore's standing behind the movement — so that simple lifestyle changes like this become points of pride for the children of the future.

"I hope that they see something as simple as recycling just a shampoo bottle or a face lotion bottle can really make a difference," Moore says.

After all, changing our — and our children's — recycling habits starts with one bottle and a little mindfulness.

Once you're on the path to a more eco-friendly lifestyle, it's easier to keep going. Just keep reminding yourself that your actions can (and will) change the world.

Thankfully, we live in a time when information is always at our fingertips, so we're even more capable of staying on top of eco-friendly trends.

"I think it's our responsibility to stay informed and to figure out new and sort of innovative ways that we can contribute because we are all connected," Moore says.

And since the younger generations are all about taking action in the face of uncertainty, research will no doubt quickly turn into noticeable change. It's important to keep encouraging that activism as much as we can.

But making changes isn't just on their shoulders. We need to be much more conscious of where our waste ends up. It's not just about our children's future. Climate change is in out midst, but our efforts today have the power to positively impact our future.

To learn more about the Rinse, Recycle, Repeat campaign, check out this video:

True

Anne Hebert, a marketing writer living in Austin, TX, jokes that her closest friends think that her hobby is "low-key harassment for social good". She authors a website devoted entirely to People Doing Good Things. She's hosted a yearly canned food drive with up to 150 people stopping by to donate, resulting in hundreds of pounds of donations to take to the food bank for the past decade.

"I try to share info in a positive way that gives people hope and makes them aware of solutions or things they can do to try to make the world a little better," she said.

For now, she's encouraging people through a barrage of persistent, informative, and entertaining emails with one goal in mind: getting people to VOTE. The thing about emailing people and talking about politics, according to Hebert, is to catch their attention—which is how lice got involved.

"When my kids were in elementary school, I was class parent for a year, which meant I had to send the emails to the other parents. As I've learned over the years, a good intro will trick your audience into reading the rest of the email. In fact, another parent told me that my emails always stood out, especially the one that started: 'We need volunteers for the Valentine's Party...oh, and LICE.'"

Hebert isn't working with a specific organization. She is simply trying to motivate others to find ways to plug in to help get out the vote.

Photo by Phillip Goldsberry on Unsplash

Keep Reading Show less
via Spencer Cox / Twitter

In the middle of a heated election, liberal and conservative Americans are at odds over a lot of issues, but there's one thing they can agree on, they're sick of all the political acrimony.

A 2018 PBS poll found that nearly three-quarters of Americans — 74 percent — think the overall tone and level of civility in the nation's capital have gotten worse since Trump was elected.

Seventy-nine percent are "are concerned or very concerned that the negative tone of national politics will prompt violence."

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash
True

Glenda moved to Houston from Ohio just before the pandemic hit. She didn't know that COVID-19-related delays would make it difficult to get her Texas driver's license and apply for unemployment benefits. She quickly found herself in an impossible situation — stranded in a strange place without money for food, gas, or a job to provide what she needed.

Alone, hungry, and scared, Glenda dialed 2-1-1 for help. The person on the other end of the line directed her to the Houston-based nonprofit Bread of Life, founded by St. John's United Methodist pastors Rudy and Juanita Rasmus.

For nearly 30 years, Bread of Life has been at the forefront of HIV/AIDS prevention, eliminating food insecurity, providing permanent housing to formerly homeless individuals and disaster relief.

Glenda sat in her car for 20 minutes outside of the building, trying to muster up the courage to get out and ask for help. She'd never been in this situation before, and she was terrified.

When she finally got out, she encountered Eva Thibaudeau, who happened to be walking down the street at the exact same time. Thibaudeau is the CEO of Temenos CDC, a nonprofit multi-unit housing development also founded by the Rasmuses, with a mission to serve Midtown Houston's homeless population.

Keep Reading Show less
via Witty Buttons / Twitter

Back in 2017, when white supremacist Richard Spencer was socked in the face by someone wearing all black at Trump's inauguration, it launched an online debate, "Is it OK to punch a Nazi?"

The essential nature of the debate was whether it was acceptable for people to act violently towards someone with repugnant reviews, even if they were being peaceful. Some suggested people should confront them peacefully by engaging in a debate or at least make them feel uncomfortable being Nazi in public.

Keep Reading Show less

When Trump entered the Oval Office on his first day as president, he was greeted by a note from his predecessor. In his letter, Obama congratulated Trump on "a remarkable run," offered a few bits of sage advice, wished him well, and told him that he and Michelle "stand ready to help in any ways which we can." It was a distinguished letter from a statesman, and a beautiful example of the peaceful and supportive transfer of power that has marked every election in modern history.

Since then, Obama has largely stayed above the fray and out of the spotlight, allowing President Trump a chance to do the job without interference. Even when his friend and former vice president Joe Biden announced his run for president, Obama held back on a formal endorsement, letting the political process run its course. At the Democratic National Convention, we saw a shift, as the former president finally let the public hear his frank assessment of Trump's job performance from his experienced point-of-view.

But at a drive-in rally in Philadelphia yesterday, Obama rolled up his sleeves, took off the gloves, and gave real voice to the frustrations half of America has felt for the past four years. And phew—it was gloriously cathartic.

Keep Reading Show less