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Tylenol

This time of year is all about family.

The one you were raised in, the one you chose for yourself, or the one that chose you. There's nothing better than spending time with the people you love, especially when you're surrounded by twinkling lights, rich desserts, and so. many. hugs.



All GIFs via Tylenol/YouTube.

But the best part of family? There's no wrong way to do it.

This heartwarming video from Tylenol's #HowWeFamily campaign is a 60-second reminder that families come in all different sizes, complete with parents, aunts, cousins, stepbrothers, friends, and more.

Trust and believe, your heart is about to grow three sizes today.

(And if you're ready to go full-feels, just scroll down for a closer look at a few ordinary families with extraordinary stories.)

Family is an action word. It's a commitment to make time, and to care for one another.

The McKennas live that every day. For 17 years, stay-at-home dad Richard has managed the day-to-day whirlwind that comes with raising five children.

"It really doesn't matter who it is that's parenting you," said Mrs. McKenna. "It's a matter of love and care and concern."

Being part of a family takes patience, sacrifice, and hard work.

Like the Butlers, two parents in the armed forces who made the difficult decision to deploy at the same time, leaving their young son with his four grandparents for a full year.

While the time away was tough, the Butler children now benefit from close relationships with their six loving parents.

Not to mention a strong foundation of love and trust.

Take Lizzie Vincent, who became a mom to her nephew after her sister and brother-in-law passed away. She used cookie baking and storytelling to spark a lasting connection.


Family is home. It's where you find your place and learn what makes you you.

Like the Ekehs, who moved from Nigeria to New York a decade ago to provide their sons with new opportunities.

One son, Harold, was accepted to 13 universities last spring — including all eight Ivy League schools! But he remains humbled, driven, and filled with gratitude for his family.


"I describe my family as a body. My parents are the brain and the heart. And my brothers, we're like the hands and the feet. We all have our different functions, but we all come together to accomplish one goal."

Yes, family is all of this. But it's also fun.


Seriously, so much fun.

Every family is different and has a unique story to tell.

The American family landscape has changed dramatically throughout the course of history, but never as fast and as furious as in recent years.

These shifts are creating diverse, blended, and nontraditional families (if there ever was a tradition to begin with).

For example, in 2014, the U.S. birthrate declined for the sixth year in a row. And the number of grandparents living with or serving as primary caregivers for their own grandchildren jumped 22% from 2000 to 2011.

Cultural and political shifts have brought changes too. A 2013 report revealed 17% of same-sex couples are raising children. And same-sex couple parents and their children are more likely to be people of color or ethnic minorities.

So this season, and throughout the year, show your family some love.

Whether you came to your clan by birth, marriage, adoption, or serendipity, embrace the people you call home and take in every magical moment.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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RumorGuard by The News Literacy Project.

The 2016 election was a watershed moment when misinformation online became a serious problem and had enormous consequences. Even though social media sites have tried to slow the spread of misleading information, it doesn’t show any signs of letting up.

A NewsGuard report from 2020 found that engagement with unreliable sites between 2019 and 2020 doubled over that time period. But we don’t need studies to show that misinformation is a huge problem. The fact that COVID-19 misinformation was such a hindrance to stopping the virus and one-third of American voters believe that the 2020 election was stolen is proof enough.

What’s worse is that according to Pew Research, only 26% of American adults are able to distinguish between fact and opinion.

To help teach Americans how to discern real news from fake news, The News Literacy Project has created a new website called RumorGuard that debunks questionable news stories and teaches people how to become more news literate.

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She's enjoying the big benefits of some simple life hacks.

James Clear’s landmark book “Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones” has sold more than 9 million copies worldwide. The book is incredibly popular because it has a simple message that can help everyone. We can develop habits that increase our productivity and success by making small changes to our daily routines.

"It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis,” James Clear writes. “It is only when looking back 2 or 5 or 10 years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.”

His work proves that we don’t need to move mountains to improve ourselves, just get 1% better every day.

Most of us are reluctant to change because breaking old habits and starting new ones can be hard. However, there are a lot of incredibly easy habits we can develop that can add up to monumental changes.

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