More

Did You Forget That Obamacare Is A Big Effin' Deal For Real People?

The road to Obamacare was fraught with challenges and roadblocks. You should probably remind everyone why it's so important. At 53 seconds they ask how a baby can be a pre-existing condition. At 1:40 an extremely important point is made. At 2:06 there's good news. At 2:34 the president starts explaining everything Obamacare does for average Americans. And after it's over, you need to share it.

Did You Forget That Obamacare Is A Big Effin' Deal For Real People?
Courtesy of Anthony Sampson
True

Anthony Sampson has understood the value of mentorship since he was a young man. Growing up in Houston, he had a mentor who helped him see the importance of volunteering and giving back to his community. By the time he graduated from college and settled in Dallas, he knew he wanted to share some of that wisdom and experience with the next generation.

That's why Sampson, an Allstate insurance agent for 38-years, co-founded 100 Black Men of Greater Dallas/Fort Worth more than 20 years ago and is still deeply involved, sitting on the board of directors. The organization matches Black male mentors with mostly young Black men to help them live up to their potential and contribute to society. By building character and producing leaders, 100 Black Men works toward improving the whole community.

"It means a lot to our mentees to see positive examples of Black men," Sampson shares. "I believe that 'What They See Is What They'll Be.' In fact, it's our organization's official motto."

According to Sampson, strong mentorship can help young people develop the skills they need "to understand how to deal with issues in life from a positive perspective." To date, the Dallas/Fort Worth chapter of 100 Black Men has mentored more than 1,500 young people.

Kynsington Hobbs is one of them. Now a senior in high school, Hobbs began a mentorship with Anthony Sampson when he was 13. He says working with Sampson changed his perspective of what success can look like in the African-American community, especially for kids who don't have dads in the picture.

Keep Reading Show less

Millie the Noodle Horse.

One of the most humane trends in the past 30 years of American life has been the decline in greyhound racing. After hitting its peak in 1985, state laws have led to the closure of racetracks across the country.

By the end of 2022, there will only be two active greyhound tracks in the United States, both in West Virginia.

The change in attitudes toward dog racing has meant an increase in greyhounds being rescued and living second lives as family pets. Greyhounds are great around children, have happy dispositions and, even though they're fast on the track, they don't require a lot of exercise.

This has led them to have the nickname the "45 mile-per-hour couch potato."

Keep Reading Show less
Courtesy of Jamel Holmes
True

As a kid, Jamel Holmes knew he wanted to be a teacher. He would spend rainy days giving spelling tests and playing math games with other children in his apartment building in New York's South Bronx.

But throughout elementary school, Holmes never had a teacher who looked like him. It wasn't until seventh grade that he had his first Black male teacher—Mr. Emdin. In some ways, he was lucky. Nearly 80% of teachers in the U.S. are white, and many Americans go their entire educations without having even one non-white teacher.

Teachers of color make a difference, which is why education nonprofit DonorsChoose has teamed up with The Allstate Foundation to support them. According to research from Johns Hopkins University and American University, having at least one Black teacher in grades three through five reduces the likelihood of Black students dropping out of high school by up to 39% and increases the likelihood that students from low-income households will aspire to attend college. An analysis published in Education Next also found that Black teachers tend to have higher expectations of Black students, which contributes to greater success.

Keep Reading Show less

This man will never not return a shopping cart again.

If you were unaware that not returning one's grocery cart to the store or the stall was a major source of controversy, welcome to the internet. Entire articles have been written about the psychology of putting your cart away in the parking lot, there's a "Shopping Cart Theory" that treats your cart-returning habits as a test of moral character, and people definitely have feelings about it.

(Full disclosure: I abandoned my cart in the parking lot once. I was a new mom with a screaming baby in the car and the cart return felt like it was miles away and I was wickedly sleep-deprived. So sorry. Please don't flog me.)

People's intense opinions on grocery cart etiquette may be why this video on Reddit of a security guard pulling a fast one on a man who did not appear to have any other reasonable excuse for not walking a few extra steps to return his cart is so popular. It feels like a bit of righteous justice being served as the bafflingly clueless man keeps being duped over and over again.

Watch:

Keep Reading Show less

Emily Ratajkowski discusses Pete Davidson's appeal.

Pete Davidson, 27, has earned the reputation as one of Hollywood's most prolific ladies' men for dating some of the most beautiful A-list women over the past three years. However, there are a lot of people out there who don't understand the "Saturday Night Live" star's appeal.

Davidson is tattooed from head to toe. He suffers from Crohn's disease, has done multiple stints in rehab, describes himself as looking like a "crack baby" and only recently moved out of his mother's basement on Staten Island.

But he's also been one of the most popular cast members on "SNL" for the past seven years and co-wrote and starred in the critically acclaimed, "The King of Staten Island."


Keep Reading Show less