Bartender explains why he swiftly kicks out Nazis even if they're 'not bothering anyone'
via Witty Buttons / Twitter

Back in 2017, when white supremacist Richard Spencer was socked in the face by someone wearing all black at Trump's inauguration, it launched an online debate, "Is it OK to punch a Nazi?"

The essential nature of the debate was whether it was acceptable for people to act violently towards someone with repugnant reviews, even if they were being peaceful. Some suggested people should confront them peacefully by engaging in a debate or at least make them feel uncomfortable being Nazi in public.


Others believed that it is totally fine to punch a Nazi.

The question of how to tolerate the intolerant was put beautifully by a philosopher named Karl Popper in 1945.

"Unlimited tolerance must lead to the disappearance of tolerance," he wrote. "If we extend unlimited tolerance even to those who are intolerant, if we are not prepared to defend a tolerant society against the onslaught of the intolerant, then the tolerant will be destroyed, and tolerance with them."

So, basically, if you tolerate the intolerant, the intolerant will eventually wipe out tolerance.

Michael B. Tager, a Baltimore-based writer and Managing Editor of Mason Jar Press, shared a similar scenario on Twitter recently that got a lot of attention. He shared a story of sitting in a punk bar when someone wearing Nazi paraphernalia sat down beside him.

The punk rock scene has always had to deal with the infusion of Nazi types since its beginnings in the late '70s. Seminal hardcore band Dead Kennedy's expressed their frustration with the interlopers in their 1981 classic, "Nazi Punks Fuck Off."

Nazi Punks Fuck Off www.youtube.com


In Tager's story, the bartender shows zero tolerance for Nazis even if they're being peaceful and he gave a powerful answer why.

via Michael B. Tager


via Michael B. Tager


via Michael B. Tager


via Michael B. Tager


via Michael B. Tager


via Michael B. Tager

During the Spanish Civil War, a famous left-wing propaganda poster showing dead children killed by Francisco Franco's Nationalists read: "If you tolerate this, then your children will be next."

via Reddit

It's a powerful statement that carries importance to this day. If we tolerate intolerant ideologies such as white supremacy, then they will be allowed to flourish. That doesn't mean society has to be violent, but the enemies of tolerance should be pushed to the periphery of society.

Kick them out of your bars, places of worship, social media feed, neighborhood, school grounds, and politics. Once the Nazis are allowed to openly operate in tolerant society, it's going to take a lot more than punching to get them out.

Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash
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Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash
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Glenda moved to Houston from Ohio just before the pandemic hit. She didn't know that COVID-19-related delays would make it difficult to get her Texas driver's license and apply for unemployment benefits. She quickly found herself in an impossible situation — stranded in a strange place without money for food, gas, or a job to provide what she needed.

Alone, hungry, and scared, Glenda dialed 2-1-1 for help. The person on the other end of the line directed her to the Houston-based nonprofit Bread of Life, founded by St. John's United Methodist pastors Rudy and Juanita Rasmus.

For nearly 30 years, Bread of Life has been at the forefront of HIV/AIDS prevention, eliminating food insecurity, providing permanent housing to formerly homeless individuals and disaster relief.

Glenda sat in her car for 20 minutes outside of the building, trying to muster up the courage to get out and ask for help. She'd never been in this situation before, and she was terrified.

When she finally got out, she encountered Eva Thibaudeau, who happened to be walking down the street at the exact same time. Thibaudeau is the CEO of Temenos CDC, a nonprofit multi-unit housing development also founded by the Rasmuses, with a mission to serve Midtown Houston's homeless population.

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