Bartender explains why he swiftly kicks out Nazis even if they're 'not bothering anyone'
via Witty Buttons / Twitter

Back in 2017, when white supremacist Richard Spencer was socked in the face by someone wearing all black at Trump's inauguration, it launched an online debate, "Is it OK to punch a Nazi?"

The essential nature of the debate was whether it was acceptable for people to act violently towards someone with repugnant reviews, even if they were being peaceful. Some suggested people should confront them peacefully by engaging in a debate or at least make them feel uncomfortable being Nazi in public.


Others believed that it is totally fine to punch a Nazi.

The question of how to tolerate the intolerant was put beautifully by a philosopher named Karl Popper in 1945.

"Unlimited tolerance must lead to the disappearance of tolerance," he wrote. "If we extend unlimited tolerance even to those who are intolerant, if we are not prepared to defend a tolerant society against the onslaught of the intolerant, then the tolerant will be destroyed, and tolerance with them."

So, basically, if you tolerate the intolerant, the intolerant will eventually wipe out tolerance.

Michael B. Tager, a Baltimore-based writer and Managing Editor of Mason Jar Press, shared a similar scenario on Twitter recently that got a lot of attention. He shared a story of sitting in a punk bar when someone wearing Nazi paraphernalia sat down beside him.

The punk rock scene has always had to deal with the infusion of Nazi types since its beginnings in the late '70s. Seminal hardcore band Dead Kennedy's expressed their frustration with the interlopers in their 1981 classic, "Nazi Punks Fuck Off."

Nazi Punks Fuck Off www.youtube.com


In Tager's story, the bartender shows zero tolerance for Nazis even if they're being peaceful and he gave a powerful answer why.

via Michael B. Tager


via Michael B. Tager


via Michael B. Tager


via Michael B. Tager


via Michael B. Tager


via Michael B. Tager

During the Spanish Civil War, a famous left-wing propaganda poster showing dead children killed by Francisco Franco's Nationalists read: "If you tolerate this, then your children will be next."

via Reddit

It's a powerful statement that carries importance to this day. If we tolerate intolerant ideologies such as white supremacy, then they will be allowed to flourish. That doesn't mean society has to be violent, but the enemies of tolerance should be pushed to the periphery of society.

Kick them out of your bars, places of worship, social media feed, neighborhood, school grounds, and politics. Once the Nazis are allowed to openly operate in tolerant society, it's going to take a lot more than punching to get them out.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.