+

Male politicians, listen up: Barack Obama is pretty fed up with all your foolishness.

Speaking at a town hall in Johannesburg, South Africa, the former president didn't mince words explaining just how badly men are failing our world as political leaders.

Photo by Themba Hadebe/AFP/Getty Images.


A woman at the town hall had asked for advice on becoming politically active in her native Kenya — a country grappling with widespread corruption. First of all, he answered, making sure more people like her have a seat at the table is an important step.

"Women in particular, by the way, I want you to get more involved," Obama said, as HuffPost reported. "Because men have been getting on my nerves lately."

"Every day I read the newspaper and I just think like, ‘Brothers, what’s wrong with you guys? What’s wrong with us?’” Obama continued. “I mean, we’re violent. We’re bullying — you know, just not handling our business."

The town hall was hosted by the Obama Foundation at the African Leadership Academy in Johannesburg. Photo by Themba Hadebe/AFP/Getty Images.

Obama may have been speaking to a global audience, but his words hit especially close to home in the U.S.

Obama's encouragement is nice. But American women may not need as much reminding as he thinks.

They're already running for office in big numbers — and winning.

Progressive Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez shocked the country with her upset victory over incumbent Joseph Crowly in a New York Congressional primary in June. Photo by Scott Heins/Getty Images.

Donald Trump's misogynistic political agenda (and personal history), the expanding #MeToo movement, a deep-rooted frustration among many women that feel as though issues important to them are being ignored — all of these play a role in a surge of female candidates running for office the past two years, analysts suggest.

"The Year of the Woman," as it's been dubbed, has seen over 2,000 women run for congressional and state-level seats, Vice reported — a truly historic figure. If that number translates into significant gender shifts in Washington and state capitals come November, it could mean big changes to what issues get prioritized: from abortion rights and education policy to expanding health care and rethinking tax reform.

It's a welcome shift, if you ask Obama: "I think empowering more women on the continent ― that, right away, is going to lead to some better policies."

Wear your values with products from PSA Supply Co., an independent site owned by our parent company, GOOD Worldwide Inc. GOOD makes money when you buy these products, and 10% of profits go to The Center for Community Change Action. Use discount code UPWORTHY to get 15% off your first order!

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

Keep ReadingShow less

RumorGuard by The News Literacy Project.

The 2016 election was a watershed moment when misinformation online became a serious problem and had enormous consequences. Even though social media sites have tried to slow the spread of misleading information, it doesn’t show any signs of letting up.

A NewsGuard report from 2020 found that engagement with unreliable sites between 2019 and 2020 doubled over that time period. But we don’t need studies to show that misinformation is a huge problem. The fact that COVID-19 misinformation was such a hindrance to stopping the virus and one-third of American voters believe that the 2020 election was stolen is proof enough.

What’s worse is that according to Pew Research, only 26% of American adults are able to distinguish between fact and opinion.

To help teach Americans how to discern real news from fake news, The News Literacy Project has created a new website called RumorGuard that debunks questionable news stories and teaches people how to become more news literate.

Keep ReadingShow less
Family

A mom describes her tween son's brain. It's a must-read for all parents.

"Sometimes I just feel really angry and I don’t know why."

This story originally appeared on 1.05.19


It started with a simple, sincere question from a mother of an 11-year-old boy.

An anonymous mother posted a question to Quora, a website where people can ask questions and other people can answer them. This mother wrote:

How do I tell my wonderful 11 year old son, (in a way that won't tear him down), that the way he has started talking to me (disrespectfully) makes me not want to be around him (I've already told him the bad attitude is unacceptable)?

It's a familiar scenario for those of us who have raised kids into the teen years. Our sweet, snuggly little kids turn into moody middle schoolers seemingly overnight, and sometimes we're left reeling trying to figure out how to handle their sensitive-yet-insensitive selves.


Keep ReadingShow less