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Age is just a number. Ask this remarkable, record-setting 105-year-old cyclist.

'I'm doing it to prove that at 105 years old, you can still ride a bike.'

Age is just a number. Ask this remarkable, record-setting 105-year-old cyclist.

Although he loved cycling, Robert Marchand stopped participating in the sport when he was just 22 years old.

His coach told him that, because of his small stature, Marchand would never become a cycling champion, CNN reported. So, Marchand figured, what's the point?

Marchand, who was born in France in 1911, went on to do other exciting things with his life after locking his bike away all those years ago. But his passion for cycling never truly subsided.


Now — more than eight decades after he first decided to quit — Marchand is proving his old coach dead wrong.

Photo by Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images.

On Jan. 4, 2017, Marchand set a new cycling record at the age of 105. And the world is giving him a much-deserved standing ovation for it.

Photo by Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images.

In one hour, Marchand pedaled 14 miles at the Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines velodrome cycling competition near Paris.

It's a new distance record for the 105-and-up category — a pool created specially for Marchand, according to the Associated Press.

Photo by Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images.

"I didn't see the sign for the last 10 minutes, otherwise I could have gone faster," the smiley record-setter told BFMTV.

Photo by Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images.

Still, he explained, he's "not here to break any record."

"I'm doing it to prove that at 105 years old, you can still ride a bike."

Photo by Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images.

Amazingly, it wasn't even until age 75 that Marchand decided to get back into the sport, CNN reported.

It's not as if he'd been lying low all those years, though. Throughout his adult life, the French veteran — who's lived through both world wars — has worked as a firefighter, a gardener, a lumberjack in Canada, and a truck driver in Venezuela, just to name a few.

After getting back into cycling as a senior, Marchand has completed impressive cross-country trips, like Bordeaux to Paris and Paris to Moscow, according to ESPN.

Photo by Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images.

"He never pushed his limits, goes to bed at 9 p.m. and wakes up at 6 a.m.," Gerard Mistler, Marchand's friend and coach, told AP. "There's no other secret."

Life's about so much more than riding bikes and setting records, and no one understands that better than Marchand.

The 105-year-old — who will turn 106 in November 2017 — is going strong thanks to his love of laughter, looking at the glass half-full, and a great group of friends who keep him young.

Photo by Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images.

He's living proof that age really is just a number.

Photo by Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images.

"Setting goals for himself is part of his personality," Coach Mistler said. "If he tells me he wants to improve his record, I'll be game. Robert is a great example for all of us."

Whether you want to graduate from college at 99 or deadlift 225 pounds at the gym at 78, Marchand's cycling record is yet another great reminder that none of us is too old to dust off an old bike and hop on for a brand new adventure.

via The Walt Disney Company / Flickr

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Of course, there's a healthy way to approach such a potentially dangerous topic.

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"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

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