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3 years ago, this 78-year-old could barely climb stairs. Now she deadlifts 225 pounds.

Watch this badass woman shatter 'little old lady' stereotypes.

3 years ago, this 78-year-old could barely climb stairs. Now she deadlifts 225 pounds.

When you think of a badass weightlifter, what image typically comes to mind?

Is it something like this?


Photo via iStock.

Or maybe this?

Photo via Republic of Korea/Flickr.

In either case, it's probably not something like this...

Photo via Kent Webb, Shirley's son, used with his permission.

Many of us have a few preconceived notions about elderly women: They're sweet and innocent. They need our help crossing the street. They're weak.

But while 78-year-old Shirley Webb certainly fits the bill when it comes to sweetness, she couldn't be farther from the "little old lady" stereotype in the strength department.

Last week, a video of her deadlifting 225 pounds not once...

Beast mode? Activated. GIFs via SoundFX/YouTube.

...not twice...

I like to call this one the "early bird special."

...but THREE times — with the ease of an angry Lou Ferrigno — made its way around the Internet.

"I'm ready for my close-up, Mr. Schwarzenegger!"

Webb's Herculean feat quickly went viral, with the online community praising her stereotype-shattering strength, resiliency, and fabulous choice of workout attire.

Webb has become something of a powerlifting powerhouse for the past year, setting deadlifting records in both her native Illinois — a staggering 237 pounds — and in neighboring Missouri.

Less than two years ago, however, Webb was another person entirely — one who very much fit in line with the common stereotype of what it means to be "elderly."

"At the time, I couldn't walk up the stairs unless I held on to the handrail, and if I got on the floor, I couldn't get up without a chair," she told "Today."

It was at that point that Webb joined Club Fitness in Wood River, Illinois, along with her granddaughter.

Under the tutelage of trainer John Wright, Webb's physical conditioning rapidly began to improve. Within six months, she was lifting over 200 pounds. Within a year, she was setting records in age and weight divisions left and right. By this time next year, one can only assume she will be bench pressing the actual bleachers her cheering section sits on. With all of them on it.

Photo via Kent Webb, used with permission.

Last June, Webb competed in the Missouri State Powerlifting and Midwest Open in St. Louis in the 75 and older division.

And, of course, she won her division with a 215-pound deadlift that would give many a younger woman or man a hernia, two separated disks, and an unrelated coffee addiction. Think I'm being hyperbolic? Go strap 20 bags of potatoes to a curtain rod and let me know how lifting it goes.

"She's gotten to the point where everybody greets her and is just absolutely impressed," Wright told ESPN. "She inspires everybody that goes to the gym and it's fun to see that."

Since her video has gone viral, Webb has also become something of a local hero to the other senior citizens in her community.

Photo via Kent Webb, used with permission.

"I've seen such a remarkable difference in myself," said Webb to "Today." "I'm glad that people are getting inspired by me doing this. I had one lady come in the gym and say, 'I saw your video and I decided to come down and join this club.' That makes me feel good."

It just goes to show that with enough motivation and persistence you really can do almost anything at any age.

"I have no intention of stopping right now," Webb told ESPN. "When I go to the gym and work out, when I leave, I feel so much better than I did when I went in, and I just feel so good. I feel tremendous."

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

Welp, the two skateboarding events added to the Olympics this year have wrapped up for the women's teams, and the results are historic in more ways than one.

Japan's Kokona Hiraki, age 12, just won the silver medal in women's park skateboarding, making her Japan's youngest Olympic medalist ever. Great Britain's Sky Brown, who was 12 when she qualified for the Tokyo Olympics and is now 13, won the bronze, making her Great Britain's youngest medalist ever. And those two medal wins mean that two-thirds of the six medalists in the two women's skateboarding events are age 13 or younger. (The gold and silver medalists in women's street skateboarding, Japan's Momiji Nishiya and Brazil's Rayssa Leal, are also 13.)

That's mind-blowing.

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