After getting an unsolicited dick pic, this woman punked her harasser with a genius fake app

Dick pics. Nobody wants them. Most women get them. A 2017 YouGov survey found that 53% of millennial women said that they have received a dick pic at some point in their lives. Of the millennial women who received dick pics, 73% said it was unsolicited. Overall, 60% of women surveyed said that they'd received an unsolicited dick pic. Yikes. We shouldn't have to worry a stranger is going to drop a D into our DMs, and yet here we are. People have found a way to make advanced and complex technology gross.

One woman's response to an unsolicited dick pic went viral because it's too brilliant not to celebrate. Jenn Tisdale took to Twitter to post her response to an unsolicited dick pic, and she deserves a medal for it. "This morning I received an unsolicited dick pic via @instagram from a man I do not know. What follows is a beautiful story I wove about an app I made up, that should exist. Enjoy!" she posted on Twitter.


RELATED: Woman developing AI that detects dick pics to make Twitter a safer place

Tisdale posted a screenshot of the exchange (excluding the graphic image.) "Sorry! Whatever image you sent isn't coming through," Tisdale wrote. "I have a photo blocker on IG." Tisdale even gave her fake app an appropriate name. "It's called Cockblock which is funny because that's what happens to those dudes in real life." The guy she was messaging even said the name deserved a Nobel Prize.

Tisdale didn't stop there. She messed with the messenger. "It's also very intuitive. It immediately sends the image and profile to the local police. I will get a call from local law enforcement asking when I can come in to file a sexual harassment report. Men who have sent me dick pics have been arrested. It's wild. LOL one guy lost his job and his wife. Technology is wild."

Fun fact, sending unsolicited dick pics is a form of harassment. Last year, Texas passed a ban on sending sexually explicit material without consent. Sending unwanted dick pics is a misdemeanor which is punishable by a fine of up to $500. New York City, where men apparently think it's totally cool to AirDrop unsolicited dick pics to strangers the subway, is considering similar legislation which would make it a misdemeanor to "send an unsolicited sexually explicit video or image to another person with intent to harass, annoy or alarm such other person."

Twitter users applauded Tinsley's elaborate response.





RELATED: Women shared how they make sexist men explain their nasty jokes, and it's so satisfying

Some people even wanted Tisdale's fictional app to become a real thing.



Oddly enough, Tisdale says the person who sent her the photo ended up blocking her.

Tisdale says her response was all part of not giving the guy what he wanted. "I know that the response men are looking for is either shock, disgust, or anger. I traffic in not giving men what they want in situations like this," Tisdale told Scary Mommy.

Ultimately, Tisdale thinks nobody deserves to get a dick pic. "I'm very lucky because I can respond to these scenarios with amusement and comedy," she told Scary Mommy. "I know a lot of people react quite differently and I do this for those people. No one deserves to have something in their box, in- or otherwise, that they didn't ask for."

There's only one question left to answer – where can people send the royalty check if they ever need to use this brilliant response?

True

Anne Hebert, a marketing writer living in Austin, TX, jokes that her closest friends think that her hobby is "low-key harassment for social good". She authors a website devoted entirely to People Doing Good Things. She's hosted a yearly canned food drive with up to 150 people stopping by to donate, resulting in hundreds of pounds of donations to take to the food bank for the past decade.

"I try to share info in a positive way that gives people hope and makes them aware of solutions or things they can do to try to make the world a little better," she said.

For now, she's encouraging people through a barrage of persistent, informative, and entertaining emails with one goal in mind: getting people to VOTE. The thing about emailing people and talking about politics, according to Hebert, is to catch their attention—which is how lice got involved.

"When my kids were in elementary school, I was class parent for a year, which meant I had to send the emails to the other parents. As I've learned over the years, a good intro will trick your audience into reading the rest of the email. In fact, another parent told me that my emails always stood out, especially the one that started: 'We need volunteers for the Valentine's Party...oh, and LICE.'"

Hebert isn't working with a specific organization. She is simply trying to motivate others to find ways to plug in to help get out the vote.

Photo by Phillip Goldsberry on Unsplash

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