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We're almost at a point where it's more surprising if a celebrity doesn't have a story about how they were sexually harassed in the early parts of their career. The good thing is, gross behavior in what's supposed to be a professional workplace environment isn't flying anymore. It's because so many women have come forward, animatedly insisting that these experiences, while normal, are not acceptable. Now, we can add Cardi B to the roster of women lending their voices to stop inappropriate behavior.

On an episode of "Untold Stories of Hip Hop," Cardi B revealed she was sexually harassed during a photo shoot. "I went to shoot for this magazine and the photographer, he was trying to get close to me like, 'Yeah, you want to get in this magazine?' Then he pulled his dick out. I was so fucking mad, and I was just like, 'This is crazy.' I was actually fucking bugging," the rapper said. The incident happened early in her career.

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via KGW-TV / YouTube

One of the major differences between women and men is that women are often judged based on their looks rather than their character or abilities.

"Men as well as women tend to establish the worth of individual women primarily by the way their body looks, research shows. We do not do this when we evaluate men," Naomi Ellemers Ph.D. wrote in Psychology Today.

Dr. Ellers believes that this tendency to judge a woman solely on her looks causes them to be seen as an object rather than a person.

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Instagram / Emma Watson

A staggering one in two women have been sexually harassed at work, but four out of five of them aren't comfortable reporting the issues to H.R., which is why actress Emma Watson launched a new hotline that offers free legal advice regarding sexual harassment in England and Wales.

The hotline is designed to help women hold their employers and harassers accountable and is the first of its kind, something Watson finds "completely staggering," she told Fast Company. Anyone who needs legal advice for dealing with these types of situations can call the hotline and speak with someone from the nonprofit, Rights of Women, without paying the lofty fees traditional lawyers often charge.

"This advice line's purpose is to empower women to exercise their legal rights in the workplace. By advising women about their legal options and increasing their understanding of equalities and discrimination law, we will be able to help them make informed choices about next steps, including how to navigate the legal system with confidence," Rights of Women's senior legal officer, Deeba Syedtold Indie Wire.

Women can get advice on determining what counts as sexual harassment, filing a complaint against an employer, making a claim, and navigating settlement and nondisclosure agreements (NDAs), Fast Company reports.

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1.

No, it's my turn to talk now.

I listened to you.

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