Watch These Guys Unknowingly Catcall Their Own Moms And Get An Embarrassing Lesson On Harassment

An interesting approach to ending street harassment in Lima, Peru, is turning some heads.

<span class="redactor-invisible-space"></span>

Street harassment is a major issue in cities across the globe. The problem is a lot of men *don't* see it as a real problem, viewing catcalling as a minor or harmless offense — even if they themselves don't participate in it.

But imagine for a second what a street harasser's mom would say if she saw him in action. Would she agree that it's "harmless"?


Only one way to find out.

A camera-equipped team in Lima, Peru, decided to find out for themselves.

Introducing "Sibale a tu Madre" ("Harassing Your Mom").

The team identified two repeat offenders then tracked down their mothers to help address their sons' disgusting behavior.

The women agreed to be made up so that they weren't immediately recognizable and headed out on the streets in search of their sons. The results? Anything but pretty.

Mom #1:

"Tasty panties?!" So. Gross.

Son: "It's just a game."
Mom: "Do you realize what you just said to me?"
S: "I thought you were Karina."


M: "Oh, so you talk to her like that?"
S: "No, I'm not being dirty."
M: "What do you mean you aren't? Did you just listen to yourself?"

**Pro-tip: He should probably stop making up stuff and start apologizing.**

Mom #2:

"Hello, piggy?!??" WTF.

Mom: "How can you be harassing them? Aren't you ashamed?"
Son: "My boss is coming out now and will see us. He'll fire me!"
M: "I don't care about your boss."
S: "It wasn't me, mom! It was the guy in the car ... my boss is coming out now and will see us.
He'll fire me."
M: "I don't care about your boss."

**Another pro-tip: Moms always know when you're full of shit.**






In both cases, the sons receive a very public (and embarrassing) lesson on sexual harassment: If you wouldn't say it to your mother (or even in her presence), is it *really* that harmless or inoffensive?

As hilarious as this video is to watch, what these (likely staged) scenes reveal is definitely not a laughing matter.

Academic studies show that 65% of women have experienced street harassment in their lifetimes. That number gets even higher when you isolate the big pedestrian cities. So, is it really that surprising that these dressed-up mamas could so easily fall prey to their sons' gross verbal harassment? Not really.

If a guy needs to be related to a woman in order to care about respecting her, or at the very least about not sexually harassing her, then he's the real "piggy." And I'm guessing he probably doesn't like being called that either.

Let's also be clear: We don't fix street harassment by replicating any "tactics" used in this video.

While this video does a good job at pointing out the fact that sexual harassment is not, in fact, silly or harmless, it does not do a great job at clarifying how we actually should tackle this issue. Just to say it, encouraging mothers to go catch their sons red-handed (then publicly humiliate or even physically assault) is 100% absolutely NOT the correct approach to fixing this behavior. Making sure that we as a society put pressure on men to make the idea of catcalling or sexually harassing women on the street an unthinkable act, now that's not a bad idea.

Here's what we can do.

1. Keep the conversation going. Discuss it amongst your friends. And when possible, share your personal stories.

2. Also, know when and how to report street harassment. While not every situation might warrant police involvement, some certainly do. Reporting serious offenses can often help prevent future crimes — and potentially more severe ones. And remember that bystanders can report offenses, too!

3. Become a mentor for young girls and boys but especially for boys. We know it doesn't matter how girls are acting or how they're dressed — they'll get catcalled and harassed regardless. But we CAN teach boys not to catcall and harass and to respect women.

4. Become a male ally. There are all sorts of books that talk about what it means to be a male ally, and why it's so critically important. If you're a book person, check out "The Macho Paradox: Why Some Men Hurt Women and How All Men Can Help" by Jackson Katz.


More
Facebook / Mikhail Galin

Putting your pet in cargo during a flight isn't always safe. In 2016, the Department of Transportation reported a total of 26 pet deaths and 22 injuries on flights. Because conditions in cargo can be uncomfortable for animals, the Humane Society recommends taking your pet aboard when you fly, or just leaving it at home.

It's not surprising that one Russian man didn't want to put his overweight cat in cargo during an eight-hour flight from Moscow to Vladivostok. What is surprising is the great lengths he took to fly with his four-legged friend.

Russian airline Aeroflot allows pets to fly inside the plane's cabin, as long as the cat weighs under 17.6 pounds and stays in its carrier during the flight. When Mikhail Galin went to check in, he was told he couldn't fly with his four-year old cat, Viktor. Viktor weighed in at 22 pounds and would have to be relegated to cargo.

But Viktor was sick from their earlier flight from Riga, Latvia to Moscow. And besides, Viktor had been allowed to fly inside the cabin during that flight. The airline staff didn't even bother to make Viktor sit on the scales. Galin was unable to persuade staff to bring his fur baby on board.

"To all attempts to explain that the cat won't survive there on an 8-hour flight with the baggage and would haunt her in her nightmares for the rest of her life, she (the Aeroflot staff member) replied that there are rules," Galin wrote in a Facebook post translated from Russian.

Keep Reading Show less
popular
Photo by Kelvin Octa from Pexels

Newborn babies don't seem to do much beyond eating and pooping and, of course, hiccupping. A lot. Parenting advice on how to cure a baby's hiccups runs the whole gamut. It's recommended parents try everything from nursing to stop feeding the baby so much, from giving the baby gripe water to letting the hiccups play their course. But when your baby hiccups too much, you shouldn't freak out. There's a good reason why.

A new study published in Clinical Neurophysiology found that hiccups play an important role in a baby's development. Researchers from the University College London found 217 babies for their study, but only looked at 13 newborns with persistent hiccups. Ten of those babies hiccupped when they were awake, and three hiccupped during their "wriggly" sleep. We have no idea how the scientists got any work done with all that cuteness lying around.

Keep Reading Show less
popular
via The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon / YouTube

Actress Kristen Bell and "The Tonight Show" host Jimmy Fallon showed off their vocal and comedic chops on Tuesday night when the performed a medley of 17 Disney songs, spanning nine decades, in just five minutes.

The duo started with 1940's "When You Wish Upon a Star" and ended with 2013's "Let it Go" from "Frozen."

Bell will reprise her role as Anna in Disney's upcoming "Frozen 2."

Keep Reading Show less
popular

Ask almost any woman about a time a man said or did something sexually inappropriate to them, and she'll have a story or four to tell. According to a survey NPR published last year, 81% of women report having experienced sexual harassment, with verbal harassment being the most common. (By contrast, 43% of men report being sexually harassed. Naturally harassment toward anyone of any sex or gender is not okay, but women have been putting up with this ish unchecked for centuries.)

One form of verbal sexual harassment is the all too common sexist or sexual "joke." Ha ha ha, I'm going to say something explicit or demeaning about you and then we can all laugh about how hilarious it is. And I'll probably get away with it because you'll be too embarrassed to say anything, and if you do you'll be accused of being overly sensitive. Ha! Won't that be a hoot?

Keep Reading Show less
popular