These powerful sexual harassment PSAs by David Schwimmer are must-sees.

Actor David Schwimmer was so disturbed by a video series a friend sent him a few months ago, he knew he had to do something.

That friend was director Sigal Avin, and those videos were part of a series of sexual harassment PSAs she'd produced in Israel, Schwimmer explained to "The View" co-hosts on April 5, 2017.

Avin had sent the videos to get Schwimmer's feedback, but — after seeing the potential effects the PSAs could have in the U.S., where an estimated 1 in 3 American women have experienced sexual harassment at work — the pair decided to create a similar series stateside.


"The current climate right now in this country ... it feels like women and their advocates are fighting for basic human and civil rights," Schwimmer explained. "Sigal and I thought, we need to explicitly state that sexual harassment and sexual assault is not permissible and also give a face to it."

They produced the six-part series — starring Schwimmer, Cynthia Nixon, Emmy Rossum, and Bobby Cannavale — which you can watch here (the PSAs will play consecutively):

During his interview on "The View," Schwimmer touched on one particularly crucial point about sexual harassment as it exists in the workplace.

Most of us can recognize explicit sexual violence — "everyone's seen the guy jumping out of the bushes," Schwimmer noted — but predatory men often take advantage of power structures in the workplace, pressuring women into uncomfortable, and even dangerous, positions. It might not be as obvious, Schwimmer said, but subtlety doesn't matter.

It's vital that men understand this "gray area," as Schwimmer put it, still qualifies as sexual harassment. It's just as unacceptable.  

"I really hope that men see these films as well, so they can learn, 'Oh, that's not appropriate behavior,'" he said.

Watch Schwimmer's interview discussing his PSA series, "That's Harassment," on "The View" below:

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.