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A Tinder troll called her out on an 'ugly dress.' The tables turned so quickly you'll get whiplash.

The internet dating scene is a minefield. On one hand, you could meet someone who's awesome and kind and exactly who you're looking to spend the next two hours to twenty five years with. On the other, sometimes you get scammers and liars.


And worse yet, sometimes you just get a jerk who's out to ruin your day for reasons that are neither apparent or important.

In other words, a troll.

That's exactly what happened to Thea Lauryn Chippendale, a 20-year-old looking for friendship (and more?) on the stormy seas of Tinder. Instead of saying "hello" or trying to open with a corny pick-up line, one guy she matched with tried a different tack: Insulting her photos.

"Not gonna lie, you're a bit of a joke, but that dress in the last photo is not doing any favours. Hope this helps," read the guy's opening volley.

[rebelmouse-image 19469773 dam="1" original_size="750x998" caption="Image of Thea in this bangin' dress via her Twitter.." expand=1]Image of Thea in this bangin' dress via her Twitter..

Thea's response was a very understated "excuse me?" which should have immediately led to an apology, but instead George (that's the guy's name) doubled down, insisting "you heard me" before saying that he "couldn't have slept" if he didn't tell Thea to "shop somewhere decent" for dresses.

Here's the entire exchange:

[rebelmouse-image 19469775 dam="1" original_size="750x1059" caption="Image via Thea's Twitter." expand=1]Image via Thea's Twitter.

Confidential to George: this sounds like a personal problem that you should absolutely see someone to talk about. Insomnia is no joke. But neither is the fact that you feel like you need to put women down in order to make yourself feel better. This attempt at negging is just so ugly and transparent. Perhaps it's time to log off Tinder and take a good hard look in the mirror for a while!

You know what though? This story isn't about George. It's about the fact that as soon as Thea posted evidence of this toxicity to social media, people rallied around her to prove that trolls like George aren't in the majority. One of those people wasn't a person at all. It was a brand called ASOS, the designer of the very dress Thea was wearing in the picture.

And if there's one thing we know about the future, it's that good things sometimes happen when brands develop disembodied voices and venture out into the twitter-sphere to make (reasonable) dreams come true.

That DM led to something really cool. ASOS started using Thea's picture as an advertisement for the dress.

[rebelmouse-image 19469776 dam="1" original_size="750x420" caption="Image via ASOS." expand=1]Image via ASOS.

Of course this is a total marketing ploy, but who's to say all marketing ploys are awful and ill-advised? In the end, it turned the tables on some unnecessary vitriol and made Thea more confident about herself.

'I'm just so grateful to everyone else for how amazing they've been and how positive and lovely everyone has been. It's been absolutely incredible," Thea told Grazia.

So what if that also sells a few more dresses?

Health

A child’s mental health concerns shouldn’t be publicized no matter who their parents are

Even politicians' children deserve privacy during a mental health crisis.

A child's mental health concerns shouldn't be publicized.

Editor's Note: If you are having thoughts about taking your own life, or know of anyone who is in need of help, the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline is a United States-based suicide prevention network of over 200+ crisis centers that provides 24/7 service via a toll-free hotline with the number 9-8-8. It is available to anyone in suicidal crisis or emotional distress.


It's an unspoken rule that children of politicians should be off limits when it comes to public figure status. Kids deserve the ability to simply be kids without the media picking them apart. We saw this during Obama's presidency when people from both ends of the political spectrum come out to defend Malia and Sasha Obama's privacy and again when a reporter made a remark about Barron Trump.

This is even more important when we are talking about a child's mental health, so seeing detailed reports about Ted Cruz's 14-year-old child's private mental health crisis was offputting, to say it kindly. It feels icky for me to even put the senator's name in this article because it feels like adding to this child's exposure.

When a child is struggling with mental health concerns, the instinct should be to cocoon them in safety, not to highlight the details or speculate on the cause. Ever since the news broke about this child's mental health, social media has been abuzz, mostly attacking the parents and speculating if the child is a member of the LGBTQ community.

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Gen Ishihara/Facebook

"AI art isn't cute."

Odds are you’ve probably seen those Lensa AI avatars floating around social media. You know, the app that turns even the most basic of selfies into fantasy art masterpieces? I wouldn’t be surprised if you have your own series of images filling up your photo bank right now. Who wouldn’t want to see themselves looking like a badass video game character or magical fairy alien?

While getting these images might seem like a bit of innocent, inexpensive fun, many are unaware that it comes at a heavy price to real digital artists whose work has been copied to make it happen. A now-viral Facebook and Instagram post, made by a couple of digital illustrators, explains how.

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This article originally appeared on 04.15.19


On May 28, 2014, 13-year-old Athena Orchard of Leicester, England, died of bone cancer. The disease began as a tumor in her head and eventually spread to her spine and left shoulder. After her passing, Athena's parents and six siblings were completely devastated. In the days following her death, her father, Dean, had the difficult task of going through her belongings. But the spirits of the entire Orchard family got a huge boost when he uncovered a secret message written by Athena on the backside of a full-length mirror.

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A Home Depot store in Newington, Connecticut.

One of Home Depot’s core values is "doing the right thing." The company explains it as exercising "good judgment by ‘doing the right thing’ instead of just ‘doing things right.’ We strive to understand the impact of our decisions, and we accept responsibility for our actions.”

The value is so important that it is written on all of its employees' work vests.

There’s no better example of employees following the company’s values than an incident that happened late last month at a Home Depot store in Bellevue, Tennessee. This story was originally reported by WSMV in Nashville, Tennessee, and we thought it was such a good deed that we wanted to share it far and wide through our Upworthy audience.

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