A national park worker opened a bumpy envelope to find an adorable note — and a surprise.

Susan Gardiner was opening the mail for Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks when she came across an envelope with a large lump — and no return address.

"I was a mail carrier for 15 years before that, so yeah, you’re always cautious of mail that has no return address," Gardiner told Upworthy.

After carefully opening the letter, the park administrator said she "got a chuckle over what [she] found inside."


It was a sequoia cone, taped to a note:


It's actually a sequoia cone. Still cute though. Photo by Meredith Elgart/Facebook.

The note, in a child's handwriting, was sent anonymously.

“I had to share it because it was so moving and so cute," she said. "So I shared it with the interpretation department, and they said they would get the cone back to where it belongs.”

True to their word, rangers placed the cone back near the General Grant tree.

The General Grant tree in Kings Canyon National Park, the second-largest tree in the world. Photo via Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, used with permission.

"We are so glad this young person thought about the park's preservation messages," an official wrote on the park's Facebook page. "Thanks for leaving Sequoia and Kings Canyon Parks as you found them. And, thanks for sending this back, buddy!"

This is a small piece of good news, and one that America's national parks could certainly use.

Though their season is only a few months in, parks across America — particularly Yellowstone — have already played host to a series of incidents where tourists violating park rules ended in tragedy.

In May, a baby bison that was picked up by Yellowstone tourists who spotted it alone on the side of the road had to be euthanized by rangers after it couldn't be returned to its herd.

And on June 9, 2016, a 23-year-old man died in the park after wandering off a boardwalk and falling into a hot spring.

The return of the sequoia cone, meanwhile, is likely to make a lot of squirrels very happy.

A squirrel eats a meal near the General Grant tree. Photo by Farmatin/Wikimedia Commons.

"Everything in nature is connected," Dana Dierkes, public affairs specialist at the parks, told Upworthy.

Dierkes explained that while pocketing a single giant sequoia cone might not seem like a big deal, for the rodents who depend on them for a food source, maintaining an untampered ecosystem is critical for their survival and success.

All it took was one child — and their parents — who decided to do the right thing.

Gardiner and Dierkes both hope the letter writer's honesty and responsibility will serve as an example to other visitors.

"I was a Girl Scout, and one of the things I learned in scouting is that the only thing you take is pictures and the only thing you leave is your footprints," Gardiner said. "So if you take stuff, there’ll be nothing left for other people to enjoy."

Kelly Clarkson and Ariana Grande duked it out on Jimmy Fallon's 'The Tonight Show.'

There are pop stars, and then there are singers. While recording studio technology can make people sound like amazing singers, the proof is in their live performances.

Kelly Clarkson and Ariana Grande took it a whole step further on "The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon," delivering not only a jaw-dropping live performance but doing so in the form of revolving pop diva hits in an "impossible karaoke" showdown. In less than five minutes, they showed off their combined ability to nail pretty much anything, from imitating iconic singers' styles to belting out well-known songs with their own vocal stylings.

Watch this and try not to be impressed:

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Are you on the hunt for some great gifts for your extra pawsome friends. Then paws what you're doing, head to our Shop and check out our curated list, which showcases the best gifts for those who love animal-themed stuff. At Upworthy Market you are directly supporting artisans who create their own products, so you are doing good with each dollar you spend.

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via PixaBay and PixaBay

A cat sitting funny and a happy pug.

When my old dog Murray really wanted to tell me something and his barking or pawing didn’t get the job done, he would start making sounds that I swear mimicked human speech. Now, I’m not entirely sure that he was attempting to get through to me as a member of my own species would, but I don’t know how else to explain this quirky behavior.

It’s pretty amazing when we see our pets cross the imaginary line that separates the species by exhibiting human-like behaviors. But if you were to try to explain them to someone who’s never had a dog or cat (or parrot you will soon see) most of them would probably just shrug it off.

So, I never really talked to anyone about my dog’s strange but funny human impersonation.

Reddit user DMLorance created a safe space for pet owners to share their stories that no one believes on the AskReddit subforum.

“Pet owners of Reddit. What quirk does your pet (past or present) do that nobody believes when you tell them?”

Here are 16 of the best responses.


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