Family

A breastfeeding mom was kicked out of a Texas pool because some people can't handle babies eating.

The solution to the issue of breastfeeding in public is incredibly simple. It's called "Move Your Eyeballs."

A breastfeeding mom was kicked out of a Texas pool because some people can't handle babies eating.

A Texas mom was kicked out of a public pool because apparently some people don't know what to do when a baby eats near them.

Misty Daugereaux was enjoying a day at Nessler Family Aquatic Center in Texas City, Texas with her nephew and two sons when she fed her 10-month-old.

She didn't rip off her top and start giving a lifeguard a lap dance. She didn't walk up to people's lounge chairs and shove her breasts into their faces. She didn't shout, "Hey everyone, come over here and watch my peep show!" She simply breastfed her baby.

Apparently, some folks at the pool took issue with Daugereaux feeding her baby near them, however. A lifeguard approached her and told her she needed to cover up. She said she didn't actually need to, and that she had a right to feed her baby there. Then the pool manager got involved. Then the police were called.


Yes, the police.

The lifeguard claimed that Daugereaux cursed at him when he asked her to cover up, but the mother says that didn't happen.

"I have two three-year-olds with me, I'm not gonna cuss somebody out," Daugereaux said to the police. "I'm just going to stand for what I believe in and feed my baby."

In bodycam footage, Daugereaux was near tears as she told the officer how she explained to the lifeguard that she had a right to feed her baby.

"I don't stand for a lot," she said, "but I will stand for that."



Daugereaux said the lifeguard told her she needed to "follow the rules," so she asked him to show her where in the rules it says that she can't feed her baby. He responded, "You need to cover up."

"Absolutely not," Daugereaux said. "It's your own discretion. I'm conscious enough to know I don't want every man in the pool looking at my boobs. But when you have a 10-month-old who doesn't take a bottle, I'm going to feed him."

She told the lifeguard to talk to his manager. But then the manager came over and told Daugereaux that she needed to leave. After speaking with the lifeguard, manager, and Daugereaux, the police officer told Daugereax to leave the facility.

The officer claimed that it was the cursing at the lifeguard, not the breastfeeding, that was the issue. However, Daugereaux claimed that never happened and even invited the officer to ask a woman who was nearby and saw the incident for her story. And considering the officer's vulgar comment at the end of the bodycam footage—"You can't just have your titties out everywhere. I know you gotta feed your kid, but go sit under a blanket or something."—it sure doesn't seem like he was there to defend this mother's legal rights.


Police Body Camera Video



The Texas City Police Department is releasing the body camera video taken on June 9, 2019, depicting the events that took place at the Nessler Park...

As a reminder, breastfeeding in public is legally protected in all 50 states, cover or no cover.

The Health and Safety Code for the state of Texas says that a mother "is entitled to breast-feed her baby in any location in which the mother is authorized to be." As of 2018, all 50 states have laws on the books protecting a mother's right to feed her baby in public.

People can voice their opinion that mothers should cover up all they want, but kicking a mother out of a public place because she is showing more breast than you feel comfortable with while feeding her baby is wrong. And considering the fact that it was 90 degrees with 90 percent humidity the day this incident took place, suggesting that Daugereaux "go sit under a blanket" or make her baby eat with a blanket over his head is just cruel.

Daugereaux has received a wave of support from the breastfeeding community, and dozens of moms staged a nurse-in at the pool to protest the incident.

Angela Dunn, a mother and a grandmother, expressed her concerns to NBC-affiliate KPRC. "I think it's especially ironic that there are women in swimsuit tops that barely cover their breasts," she said, "and it's shameful to see a mother feeding her child?"

The city has issued an apology of sorts, which it shared on the city's Facebook page.

"We, the City of Texas City are reviewing the nursing concerns raised at the Nessler Pool and how it was addressed by our staff. We apologize to Misty Daugereaux as it is clear she was offended by how she was treated at our City Facility. City policies and procedures will be reviewed and revised as deemed necessary. Any deficiencies regarding our employee's actions will be addressed with further training."

This kind of "sorry you were offended" apology seems inadequate, when the response really should have been, "We're sorry our city employees were ignorant of the law and harassed you for doing something perfectly legal." (Perhaps they could also tack on, "Hey, kudos for taking good care of your baby. You go, mama!" Just saying.)

The solution to the issue of breastfeeding in public is incredibly simple.

Debates over breastfeeding in public usually boil down to subjective standards of exactly how much breast skin or how many milliseconds of nipple is offensive to people's sensibilities when they're in the vicinity of a feeding baby.

But guess what! There's a super simple, 100% free, practically-zero-effort solution to this problem. It's so easy and readily available, I am constantly amazed that more people don't implement it. It's called "Moving Your Eyeballs," and it guarantees that no one ever has to watch a mom breastfeed in public. Here's a video that explains exactly how it works.

Seriously. So. Simple.


Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels
True

Increasingly customers are looking for more conscious shopping options. According to a Nielsen survey in 2018, nearly half (48%) of U.S. consumers say they would definitely or probably change their consumption habits to reduce their impact on the environment.

But while many consumers are interested in spending their money on products that are more sustainable, few actually follow through. An article in the 2019 issue of Harvard Business Review revealed that 65% of consumers said they want to buy purpose-driven brands that advocate sustainability, but only about 26% actually do so. It's unclear where this intention gap comes from, but thankfully it's getting more convenient to shop sustainably from many of the retailers you already support.

Amazon recently introduced Climate Pledge Friendly, "a new program to help make it easy for customers to discover and shop for more sustainable products." When you're browsing Amazon, a Climate Pledge Friendly label will appear on more than 45,000 products to signify they have one or more different sustainability certifications which "help preserve the natural world, reducing the carbon footprint of shipments to customers," according to the online retailer.

Amazon

In order to distinguish more sustainable products, the program partnered with a wide range of external certifications, including governmental agencies, non-profits, and independent laboratories, all of which have a focus on preserving the natural world.

Keep Reading Show less
Images via Canva and Unsplash

If there's one thing that everyone can agree on, it's that being in a pandemic sucks.

However, we seem to be on different pages as to what sucks most about it. Many of us are struggling with being separated from our friends and loved ones for so long. Some of us have lost friends and family to the virus, while others are dealing with ongoing health effects of their own illness. Millions are struggling with job loss and financial stress due to businesses being closed. Parents are drowning, dealing with their kids' online schooling and lack of in-person social interactions on top of their own work logistics. Most of us hate wearing masks (even if we do so diligently), and the vast majority of us are just tired of having to think about and deal with everything the pandemic entails.

Much has been made of the mental health impact of the pandemic, which is a good thing. We need to have more open conversations about mental health in general, and with everything so upside down, it's more important now than ever. However, it feels like pandemic mental health conversations have been dominated by people who want to justify anti-lockdown arguments. "We can't let the cure be worse than the disease," people say. Kids' mental health is cited as a reason to open schools, the mental health challenges of financial despair as a reason to keep businesses open, and the mental health impact of social isolation as a reason to ditch social distancing measures.

It's not that those mental health challenges aren't real. They most definitely are. But when we focus exclusively on the mental health impact of lockdowns, we miss the fact that there are also significant mental health struggles on the other side of those arguments.

Keep Reading Show less
True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.

Keep Reading Show less
True
Gates Foundation

Once upon a time, a scientist named Dr. Andrew Wakefield published in the medical journal The Lancet that he had discovered a link between autism and vaccines.

After years of controversy and making parents mistrust vaccines, along with collecting $674,000 from lawyers who would benefit from suing vaccine makers, it was discovered he had made the whole thing up. The Lancet publicly apologized and reported that further investigation led to the discovery that he had fabricated everything.

Keep Reading Show less
via Budweiser

Budweiser beer, and its low-calorie counterpart, Bud Light, have created some of the most memorable Super Bowl commercials of the past 37 years.

There were the Clydesdales playing football and the poor lost puppy who found its way home because of the helpful horses. Then there were the funny frogs who repeated the brand name, "Bud," "Weis," "Er."

We can't forget the "Wassup?!" ad that premiered in December 1999, spawning the most obnoxious catchphrase of the new millennium.

Keep Reading Show less