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A boy in America explains to a girl on the other side of the globe how racism feels.

When a kid in America was shot by the police, she heard about it from across the globe.

The schools these kids go to every day have metal detectors.

Every kid has to wake up and be reminded of the obstacles they face the second they arrive to class.


All GIFs via Sundance Institute/Vimeo.

In spite of that, they still kick butt every day, making and telling and hearing stories of the world that 10 years ago they wouldn't have had the opportunity to be exposed to.

This amazing bunch of kids in Philadelphia are blessed with having an awesome mentor who wants to connect them with the world.

Sannii Crespina-Flores runs the Do Remember Me Project, which helps kids from Philadelphia, New York, Tanzania, Nigeria, Uganda, Kenya, Paris, and Kazakhstan connect with each other and discover that their worlds are not as different as one might think.

She guides them to ask real questions and learn about what separates us and what unites us.

And they get real.

The program connects them to others and shows them a view of the world very different from the mainstream.

Their conversations make the world more accessible to them and spread empathy, kindness, and understanding.

One student connects with a group of youths in Lagos, Nigeria.

This short documentary will take 10 minutes of your time and asks some interesting questions.

At 4:00, a girl from across the globe asks, "Have you experienced racism?"

"Yes" says 12-year-old Nasir and tells a story that's pretty gut-wrenching.

At 7:11, some kids from France ask, "Where are you from?" and get confused when the kids' answers aren't a country in Africa.

These are powerful moments — among many — that remind us that we are all human, together and connected.

It's worth your time:

They'd love it if you helped make sure their story is seen by more folks. Additionally, if you'd like to learn more about them you can Like them on Facebook and donate at their site.

As face masks have become mandatory in many places to limit the spread of coronavirus, it's also become an increasingly politicized thing. As we know, anything that involves political polarization also involves vast amounts of misinformation and disinformation. Whose idea was the internet again?

No one I know loves wearing a mask. We all wish we didn't have to. But there are an awful lot of people saying they can't wear one, or they refuse to wear one because they've been led to believe that masks are somehow more dangerous than not wearing one. I've seen and read "information" on everything from masks depriving people of oxygen to masks causing CO2 build up to masks creating fungus problems.

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