9 kick-ass, inspiring signs you can print and take to the Women's March.

We're only a few weeks into 2017, but already the Women's March on Washington is gearing up to be one of the biggest events of the year.

With sister marches planned in over 600 cities across nearly 50 countries on six continents, the event has evolved into what can safely be called a movement with a broad, unifying platform. If you're heading out on Saturday hoping your photo will land on the pages of your child's future U.S. history book, you're going to need to stand out. Fear not: We have you covered.

We've put together a few posters that you can print and rock in your city's march on Saturday.

Print them, paint them, or pick pieces of a few and put them together. (For super-high-resolution, as well as black-and-white printable versions, head to this folder.)


1. You could repurpose a certain someone's old slogan:

Image by Carlos Foglia/Upworthy.

2. Speaking of Lady Liberty, you could draw inspiration from the statue's inscription:

Image by Carlos Foglia/Upworthy.

3. The Declaration of Independence might only talk about men, but we know all people deserve equal opportunity.

Image by Carlos Foglia/Upworthy.

4. Rock the words from women who've said it best:

Image by Carlos Foglia/Upworthy.

Whether or not you share their struggle, good feminism means being an ally to all women, which is something that African-American feminist and civil rights activist Audre Lorde understood well. Especially if you benefit from other types of privilege, listening to and amplifying others' voices is as important as raising your own.

5. Remind lawmakers that talk of assaulting women has no place in the Oval Office.

Image by Amanda Pell/Upworthy.

6. Or let the words of international women's rights champion Malala Yousafzai speak for you:

Image by Carlos Foglia/Upworthy.

7. Or draw inspiration from American suffragette (and the first woman to run for president!) Victoria Woodhull:

Image by Carlos Foglia/Upworthy.

8. Use your poster to remind the government how science works:

Removing access to proper women's health and child care or repealing contraception coverage can't be the answer.

Image by Carlos Foglia/Upworthy.

Image by Amanda Pell/Upworthy.

9. And finally, for those who are just plain fed up:

Image by Amanda Pell/Upworthy.

Demand justice for yourself and your sister marchers by asserting what we know to be true: We are enough to merit the same treatment and pay as every other individual.

No matter what slogan you go with — or if you don't go with one at all! — we'll be proud to be out there with you marching for what we all believe in.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.