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669 Jewish children were saved from the Holocaust by a single man. This is how they thanked him.

On the eve of the Second World War, Sir Nicholas Winton rescued and found homes for 669 Jewish children destined for a Nazi death camp. This clip takes place 50 years after the rescue.

669 Jewish children were saved from the Holocaust by a single man. This is how they thanked him.

Nicholas Winton is a hero.

After Kristallnacht — an especially HORRIBLE day in November 1938 when German Nazis attacked Jewish people and property — the U.K. passed a measure that would allow Jewish refugees younger than 17 to come to Britain, provided they had a place to stay and a "warranty" of £50 deposited so that they'd eventually go back to Germany/their own country.

A nice gesture but definitely not an easy thing for a kid to do.


So here's where Sir Winton (and his mom!) came into play. Around Christmastime 1938, instead of going on a vacation to Switzerland like most of his fancy banker friends did, Sir Winton decided to go to Prague and set up a refugee system for Jewish children at risk from the Nazis.

He did this all at his hotel's dining room table:

He and his mother saved 669 children.

Sir Winton and his mother used the refugee system they set up and found homes and hostels for as many kids as they could, most of whom lost their parents and grandparents in Auschwitz and other Nazi concentration camps during the war.

Fast forward to 1988.

Sir Winton was invited to the taping of a BBC program called "That's Life." He was just sitting in the audience when BAM! The host of the show asked a simple question:

All the children he had saved 50 years ago had grown up, and many of them were sitting in the audience RIGHT NEXT TO HIM THE WHOLE TIME.

AHHHH!

We always say to never forget the bad things that happen, and it's important to hold those memories close. But this moment is a great reminder that we should also NEVER forget the good things. Like this courageous man and the 669 children he saved from the Nazis.

Jan. 27 is International Holocaust Remembrance Day, and 2015 marks the 70th anniversary of the Auschwitz liberation. Let's not forget.

Photo courtesy of Yoplait
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When Benny Mendez asked his middle school P.E. students why they wanted to participate in STOKED—his new after school program where kids can learn to skateboard, snowboard, and surf—their answers surprised him.

I want to be able to finally see the beach, students wrote. I want to finally be able to see the snow.

Never having seen snow is understandable for Mendez's students, most who live in Inglewood, CA, just outside of Los Angeles. But never having been to the beach is surprising, since most of them only live 15-20 minutes from the ocean. Mendez discovered many of them don't even know how to swim.

"A lot of the kids shared that they just want to go on adventures," says Mendez. "They love nature, but...they just see it in pictures. They want to be out there."

Mendez is in his third year of teaching physical education at View Park K-8 school, one of seven Inner City Foundation Education schools in the Los Angeles area. While many of his students are athletically gifted, Mendez says, they often face challenges outside of school that limit their opportunities. Some of them live in neighborhoods where it's unsafe to leave their houses at certain times of day due to gang activity, and many students come to his P.E. class with no understanding of why learning about physical health is important.

"There's a lot going on at home [with my students]," says Mendez. "They're coming from either a single parent home, or foster care. There's a lot of trauma behind what's going on at home...that is out of our control."

Photo courtesy of Yoplait

What Mendez can control is what he gives his students when they're in his care, which is understanding, some structure, and the chance to try new things. Mendez wakes up at 4:00 a.m. most days and often doesn't get home until 9:00 p.m. as he works tirelessly to help kids thrive. Not only does he run after school programs, but he coaches youth soccer on the weekends as well. He also works closely with other teachers and guidance counselors at the school to build strong relationships with students, and even serves as a mentor to his former students who are now in high school.

Now Mendez is earning accolades far and wide for his efforts both in and out of the classroom, including a surprise award from Yoplait and Box Tops for Education.

Yoplait and Box Tops are partnering this school year to help students reach their fullest potential, which includes celebrating teachers and programs that support that mission. Yoplait is committed to providing experiences for kids and families to connect through play, so teaming up with Box Tops provided an opportunity to support programs like STOKED.

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This article originally appeared on 5.7.15



The Story of Bottled Water www.youtube.com

Here are six facts from the video above by The Story of Stuff Project that I'll definitely remember next time I'm tempted to buy bottled water.

1. Bottled water is more expensive than tap water (and not just a little).

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Photo courtesy of Macy's
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Did you know that girls who are encouraged to discover and develop their strengths tend to be more likely to achieve their goals? It's true. The question, however, is how to encourage girls to develop self-confidence and grow up healthy, educated, and independent.

The answer lies in Girls Inc., a national nonprofit serving girls ages 5-18 in more than 350 cities across North America. Since first forming in 1864 to serve girls and young women who were experiencing upheaval in the aftermath of the Civil War, they've been on a mission to inspire girls to kick butt and step into leadership roles — today and in the future.

This is why Macy's has committed to partnering with Girls Inc. and making it easy to support their mission. In a national campaign running throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases to the nearest dollar or donate online to support Girls Inc. and empower girls throughout the country.


Kaylin St. Victor, a senior at Brentwood High School in New York, is one of those girls. She became involved in the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc. when she was in 9th grade, quickly becoming a role model for her peers.

Photo courtesy of Macy's

Within her first year in the organization, she bravely took on speaking opportunities and participated in several summer programs focused on advocacy, leadership, and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). "The women that I met each have a story that inspires me to become a better person than I was yesterday," said St. Victor. She credits her time at Girls Inc. with making her stronger and more comfortable in her own skin — confidence that directly translates to high achievement in education and the workforce.

In 2020, Macy's helped raise $1.3 million in support of their STEM and college and career readiness programming for more than 26,000 girls. In fact, according to a recent study, Girls Inc. girls are significantly more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, to be interested in STEM careers, and to perform better on standardized math tests.

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