+
108-year-old woman credits her longevity to one thing: champagne
via Facebook / Bupa UK

Dorothy Flowers recently celebrated her 108th birthday at the Southlands Care Home in Harrogate, North Yorkshire in England.

When Flowers was born back in 1911, humans had just learned to fly, the first World War was on the horizon, and nobody would know what a selfie was for at least 90 years.

It feels nearly impossible to imagine the changes that Flowers has seen over the years. She's lived through two world wars, the invention of radio, television, and the Internet.


But it seems that she made it this far because she knew how to take it easy every once in a while.

She credits her longevity to drinking a glass of champagne occasionally. So cheers to you, Dorothy Flowers!

RELATED: A server accidentally served a $5,750 bottle of wine and her manager told the world about it on Twitter

To celebrate Flowers's 108th, the care home put out a call for birthday cards, and Flowers received 650 of them.

via Facebook / Bupa UK

Flowers may not be too far off the mark by crediting her longevity to drinking champagne. A recent study published in Wine Spectator shows that moderate, daily wine drinkers live longer than those who do not.

The 90+ Study, an ongoing project by the University of California at Irvine Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders, looked at a variety of lifestyle habits to see how they impact longevity.

RELATED: What happens after drinking 1, 2, and 3 glasses of wine? 19 viral photos tell all.

The study found that those who drank two glasses of wine or beer a day had an 18% reduced risk of premature death over those who abstained.

Researchers haven't provided any specific reasons as to why those who drink on a daily basis live longer. But we should take their word for it.

In an email to Wine Spectator, Dana Greenia, a co-investigator of the 90+ Study said, "Simply, people who drank moderate amounts of alcohol or coffee lived longer than those who abstained."

One of the oldest people on Earth and a team of scientists all agree that boozing it up a little every day can help you live longer. Pop a cork on a bottle champs tonight and if anyone judges you, tell them you're only doing it for your health. We're sure Dorothy Flowers would approve.

Cheers.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

Keep ReadingShow less

People have clearly missed their free treats.

The COVID-19 pandemic had us waving a sad farewell to many of life’s modern conveniences. And where it certainly hasn’t been the worst loss, not having free samples at grocery stores has undoubtedly been a buzzkill. Sure, one can shop around without the enticing scent of hot, fresh artisan pizza cut into tiny slices or testing out the latest fancy ice cream … but is it as joyful? Not so much.

Trader Joe’s, famous for its prepandemic sampling stations, has recently brought the tradition back to life, and customers are practically dancing through the aisles.


On the big comeback weekend, people flocked to social media to share images and videos of their free treats, including festive Halloween cookies (because who doesn’t love TJ’s holiday themed items?) along with hopeful messages for the future.
Keep ReadingShow less

She's enjoying the big benefits of some simple life hacks.

James Clear’s landmark book “Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones” has sold more than 9 million copies worldwide. The book is incredibly popular because it has a simple message that can help everyone. We can develop habits that increase our productivity and success by making small changes to our daily routines.

"It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis,” James Clear writes. “It is only when looking back 2 or 5 or 10 years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.”

His work proves that we don’t need to move mountains to improve ourselves, just get 1% better every day.

Most of us are reluctant to change because breaking old habits and starting new ones can be hard. However, there are a lot of incredibly easy habits we can develop that can add up to monumental changes.

Keep ReadingShow less