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Your latest iPhone update comes with some delightfully diverse new emoji options.

Apple's iOS 10 update brings some cool new features to the table.

Your latest iPhone update comes with some delightfully diverse new emoji options.

On Sept. 13, millions of iPhone users downloaded Apple's new iOS 10 update, bringing more than a dozen new or revamped features to the company's devices.

Some changes, such as the revamped Messages app, are bound to be appreciated more than others (sorry, Apple Music). There's one tweak, however, that users may not have even noticed: new emojis.

Eddy Cue, Apple senior vice president of internet software and services, introduces iOS 10 on June 13, 2016. Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images.


Yes, emojis, everyone's favorite cartoon substitution for words, got a new look in the latest update.

Nearly all of us use them (a 2015 survey found that 92% of online consumers use emojis). Whether you're tweeting, texting, shopping, or flirting, emojis are a useful way to express how you're feeling when words just don't quite get the job done.

Here's the evolution of the "Woman with bunny ears" emoji from 2011 to 2016 in iOS updates. Image by Apple.

As has been the case in previous updates, many existing emojis have been given a fresh new look. The bigger news here, however, has to do with the 100% new emojis that have been added.

For some time, people have been calling for more diverse emoji options, especially when it comes to gender. In this latest update, there's some big improvements.

Earlier this year, Always ran an ad campaign that addressed an inconvenient fact about how women were being represented in emoji-land. Even with just a quick glance, it's easy to see the problem: stereotypes. While men were shown as being detectives, police officers, construction workers, and doctors, women were represented as brides and princesses.

Your typical emoji-man vs. your typical emoji-woman. Image by Apple.

The latest update contains 37 new emojis — 17 of which are women.

For the most part (there are two exceptions), every emoji that was previously only available as a man is now available as a woman as well. The same goes for the emojis that used to be only women (such as the princess), which are now available as men (like the prince).

Image by Apple.

All this is in addition to the ability to change emoji skin tone — something that was made available during a previous update. Now, men, women, boys, and girls will all have equal ability to express themselves in emoji form.

Image by Apple.

Is this a solution to the world's biggest problem? Of course not, but it's still a very good thing.

It's easy to ridicule anyone who says that this type of representation doesn't really matter; it's easy to roll your eyes at this change.

Image by Apple

There are two important things to remember, however: first, that gendered stereotypes are learned at a young age, and second, that texting is one of the most popular forms of communication for young teens.

Image by Apple.

For a full breakdown of all the new emoji options, you can check out Emojipedia's iOS 10 changelog.

Be sure to check out other new options, such as the single parent emojis and some of the revamped styles.

Albert Einstein

One of the strangest things about being human is that people of lesser intelligence tend to overestimate how smart they are and people who are highly intelligent tend to underestimate how smart they are.

This is called the Dunning-Kruger effect and it’s proven every time you log onto Facebook and see someone from high school who thinks they know more about vaccines than a doctor.

The interesting thing is that even though people are poor judges of their own smarts, we’ve evolved to be pretty good at judging the intelligence of others.

“Such findings imply that, in order to be adaptive, first impressions of personality or social characteristics should be accurate,” a study published in the journal Intelligence says. “There is accumulating evidence that this is indeed the case—at least to some extent—for traits such as intelligence extraversion, conscientiousness, openness, and narcissism, and even for characteristics such as sexual orientation, political ideology, or antigay prejudice.”

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'Merry Christmas' on YouTube.

The world must have been—mostly—good this year. Because Elton John and Ed Sheeran have teamed up to gift us all with a brand new Christmas single.

The song, aptly named “Merry Christmas,” is a perfect blend of silly and sweet that’s cheery, bright and just a touch bizarre.

Created with the holiday spirit in every way, it has whimsical snowball fights, snow angels (basically all the snow things), festive sweaters, iconic throwbacks and twinkling lights galore. Plus all profits from the tune are dedicated to two charities: the Ed Sheeran Suffolk Music Foundation and the Elton John AIDS Foundation.

I personally don’t know which is more of a highlight: Ed Sheeran channeling his inner-Mariah, performing a faux sexy dance in a leg revealing Santa outfit, or him flying through the air with a giant Frosty the Snowman … who seems to be sporting glasses similar to Elton’s. Are we meant to believe that Elton is the Snowman? This music video even has mystery.
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